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Vitamins A, C and E and the risk of breast cancer: results from a case-control study in Greece.
Br J Cancer 1999; 79(1):23-9BJ

Abstract

Although several dietary compounds are hypothesized to have anticarcinogenic properties, the role of specific micronutrients in the development of breast cancer remains unclear. To address this issue, we assessed intake of retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E in relation to breast cancer risk in a case-control study in Greece. Eight hundred and twenty women with histologically confirmed breast cancer were compared with 1548 control women. Dietary data were collected through a 115-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Data were modelled by logistic regression, with adjustment for total energy intake and established breast cancer risk factors, as well as mutual adjustment among the micronutrients. Among post-menopausal women, there was no association between any of the micronutrients evaluated and risk of breast cancer. Among premenopausal women, beta-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E were each inversely associated with breast cancer risk, but after mutual adjustment among the three nutrients only beta-carotene remained significant; the odds ratio (OR) for a one-quintile increase in beta-carotene intake was 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.73-0.97). The inverse association observed with beta-carotene intake, however, is slightly weaker than the association previously observed with vegetable intake in these data, raising the possibility that the observed beta-carotene effect is accounted for by another component of vegetables.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10408688

Citation

Bohlke, K, et al. "Vitamins A, C and E and the Risk of Breast Cancer: Results From a Case-control Study in Greece." British Journal of Cancer, vol. 79, no. 1, 1999, pp. 23-9.
Bohlke K, Spiegelman D, Trichopoulou A, et al. Vitamins A, C and E and the risk of breast cancer: results from a case-control study in Greece. Br J Cancer. 1999;79(1):23-9.
Bohlke, K., Spiegelman, D., Trichopoulou, A., Katsouyanni, K., & Trichopoulos, D. (1999). Vitamins A, C and E and the risk of breast cancer: results from a case-control study in Greece. British Journal of Cancer, 79(1), pp. 23-9.
Bohlke K, et al. Vitamins A, C and E and the Risk of Breast Cancer: Results From a Case-control Study in Greece. Br J Cancer. 1999;79(1):23-9. PubMed PMID: 10408688.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamins A, C and E and the risk of breast cancer: results from a case-control study in Greece. AU - Bohlke,K, AU - Spiegelman,D, AU - Trichopoulou,A, AU - Katsouyanni,K, AU - Trichopoulos,D, PY - 1999/7/17/pubmed PY - 1999/7/17/medline PY - 1999/7/17/entrez SP - 23 EP - 9 JF - British journal of cancer JO - Br. J. Cancer VL - 79 IS - 1 N2 - Although several dietary compounds are hypothesized to have anticarcinogenic properties, the role of specific micronutrients in the development of breast cancer remains unclear. To address this issue, we assessed intake of retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E in relation to breast cancer risk in a case-control study in Greece. Eight hundred and twenty women with histologically confirmed breast cancer were compared with 1548 control women. Dietary data were collected through a 115-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Data were modelled by logistic regression, with adjustment for total energy intake and established breast cancer risk factors, as well as mutual adjustment among the micronutrients. Among post-menopausal women, there was no association between any of the micronutrients evaluated and risk of breast cancer. Among premenopausal women, beta-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E were each inversely associated with breast cancer risk, but after mutual adjustment among the three nutrients only beta-carotene remained significant; the odds ratio (OR) for a one-quintile increase in beta-carotene intake was 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.73-0.97). The inverse association observed with beta-carotene intake, however, is slightly weaker than the association previously observed with vegetable intake in these data, raising the possibility that the observed beta-carotene effect is accounted for by another component of vegetables. SN - 0007-0920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10408688/Vitamins_A_C_and_E_and_the_risk_of_breast_cancer:_results_from_a_case_control_study_in_Greece_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6690006 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -