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Iron deficiency anaemia and adverse dietary habits in hospitalised children.
N Z Med J. 1999 Jun 11; 112(1089):203-6.NZ

Abstract

AIMS

To determine the prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in children hospitalised with acute illness and the frequency of adverse dietary habits in the children with iron deficiency anaemia.

METHODS

This was a prospective study of all children, aged 9 to 23 months resident in metropolitan Auckland who were hospitalised at Starship Children's Hospital, from July to October 1997, with an acute medical illness and had a full blood count performed. Iron deficiency anaemia was defined as haemoglobin <110 g/L, red cell distribution width >14.5% and either serum ferritin <10 microg/L or transferrin saturation <10%. Ethnicity and dietary habits of the children were determined by interviewing parents.

RESULTS

During the study period 284 children, aged 9 to 23 months were admitted, of whom 206 (73%) had a full blood count performed. Sixty (29%) of these 206 children had iron deficiency anaemia. A larger proportion of Pacific Islands (P) compared to Maori (M) or European children (E) had iron deficiency anaemia. (P vs M:43% vs 21%, p=0.01; P vs E:43% vs 14%, p<0.001; M vs E 21% vs 14%, P=0.27). Sixty-nine percent of the children with iron deficiency anaemia had a dietary factor (early introduction of cows milk, late introduction of meat or regular consumption of tea) likely to have contributed to their iron deficiency.

CONCLUSIONS

Iron deficiency is prevalent in Auckland children aged 9 to 23 months, hospitalised with an acute illness. The prevalence varies with ethnicity. Adverse dietary habits are present in 69% of the children with iron deficiency anaemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Paediatrics, Starship Children's Hospital, Auckland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10414620

Citation

Wilson, C, et al. "Iron Deficiency Anaemia and Adverse Dietary Habits in Hospitalised Children." The New Zealand Medical Journal, vol. 112, no. 1089, 1999, pp. 203-6.
Wilson C, Grant CC, Wall CR. Iron deficiency anaemia and adverse dietary habits in hospitalised children. N Z Med J. 1999;112(1089):203-6.
Wilson, C., Grant, C. C., & Wall, C. R. (1999). Iron deficiency anaemia and adverse dietary habits in hospitalised children. The New Zealand Medical Journal, 112(1089), 203-6.
Wilson C, Grant CC, Wall CR. Iron Deficiency Anaemia and Adverse Dietary Habits in Hospitalised Children. N Z Med J. 1999 Jun 11;112(1089):203-6. PubMed PMID: 10414620.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron deficiency anaemia and adverse dietary habits in hospitalised children. AU - Wilson,C, AU - Grant,C C, AU - Wall,C R, PY - 1999/7/22/pubmed PY - 1999/7/22/medline PY - 1999/7/22/entrez SP - 203 EP - 6 JF - The New Zealand medical journal JO - N Z Med J VL - 112 IS - 1089 N2 - AIMS: To determine the prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in children hospitalised with acute illness and the frequency of adverse dietary habits in the children with iron deficiency anaemia. METHODS: This was a prospective study of all children, aged 9 to 23 months resident in metropolitan Auckland who were hospitalised at Starship Children's Hospital, from July to October 1997, with an acute medical illness and had a full blood count performed. Iron deficiency anaemia was defined as haemoglobin <110 g/L, red cell distribution width >14.5% and either serum ferritin <10 microg/L or transferrin saturation <10%. Ethnicity and dietary habits of the children were determined by interviewing parents. RESULTS: During the study period 284 children, aged 9 to 23 months were admitted, of whom 206 (73%) had a full blood count performed. Sixty (29%) of these 206 children had iron deficiency anaemia. A larger proportion of Pacific Islands (P) compared to Maori (M) or European children (E) had iron deficiency anaemia. (P vs M:43% vs 21%, p=0.01; P vs E:43% vs 14%, p<0.001; M vs E 21% vs 14%, P=0.27). Sixty-nine percent of the children with iron deficiency anaemia had a dietary factor (early introduction of cows milk, late introduction of meat or regular consumption of tea) likely to have contributed to their iron deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: Iron deficiency is prevalent in Auckland children aged 9 to 23 months, hospitalised with an acute illness. The prevalence varies with ethnicity. Adverse dietary habits are present in 69% of the children with iron deficiency anaemia. SN - 0028-8446 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10414620/Iron_deficiency_anaemia_and_adverse_dietary_habits_in_hospitalised_children_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/childrenshealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -