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Conflicting advice? Australian adolescents' use of condoms or the pill.
Fam Plann Perspect. 1999 Jul-Aug; 31(4):190-4.FP

Abstract

CONTEXT

Teenagers are exposed to two potentially conflicting sexual health messages, one emphasizing the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and the other stressing pregnancy prevention. To protect teenagers from both STDs and unwanted pregnancy, it is important to know what method choices they make and why.

METHODS

Data from a 1997 national survey of 3,550 Australian secondary school students were used to examine teenagers' method choice and patterns of advice-seeking about contraception and STD prevention. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with the exclusive use of condoms or the pill.

RESULTS

Virtually all 961 currently sexually active students were using at least one contraceptive method--primarily condoms (78%) or the pill (45%). Some 31% were using condoms exclusively, and 10% were using the pill exclusively. Older students and those who had sought contraceptive advice had elevated odds of using the pill rather than condoms exclusively (odds ratios, 4.4 and 2.6, respectively), while those who had had only casual partners in the last year had a reduced likelihood of exclusive pill rather than condom use (0.1). Furthermore, the more students believed that their peers used condoms, the less likely they were to report exclusive pill use (0.4). Parents were the most frequent source of advice about contraception, followed by physicians and teachers. The most common sources of advice about HIV and other STDs were parents, teachers and then physicians.

CONCLUSIONS

Young people must be educated about the distinction between safer sex and contraception, and about how to prevent both STDs and pregnancy. Providing parents with current sexual health information may help to improve young people's sexual health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, Melbourne.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10435218

Citation

Lindsay, J, et al. "Conflicting Advice? Australian Adolescents' Use of Condoms or the Pill." Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 31, no. 4, 1999, pp. 190-4.
Lindsay J, Smith AM, Rosenthal DA. Conflicting advice? Australian adolescents' use of condoms or the pill. Fam Plann Perspect. 1999;31(4):190-4.
Lindsay, J., Smith, A. M., & Rosenthal, D. A. (1999). Conflicting advice? Australian adolescents' use of condoms or the pill. Family Planning Perspectives, 31(4), 190-4.
Lindsay J, Smith AM, Rosenthal DA. Conflicting Advice? Australian Adolescents' Use of Condoms or the Pill. Fam Plann Perspect. 1999 Jul-Aug;31(4):190-4. PubMed PMID: 10435218.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Conflicting advice? Australian adolescents' use of condoms or the pill. AU - Lindsay,J, AU - Smith,A M, AU - Rosenthal,D A, PY - 1999/8/6/pubmed PY - 1999/8/6/medline PY - 1999/8/6/entrez KW - Adolescents KW - Age Factors KW - Australia KW - Barrier Methods KW - Behavior KW - Beliefs KW - Communication KW - Condom KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Contraceptive Usage KW - Culture KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Education KW - Family And Household KW - Family Characteristics KW - Family Planning KW - Family Relationships KW - Knowledge Sources KW - Oceania KW - Oral Contraceptives KW - Parents KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Premarital Sex Behavior KW - Research Report KW - Risk Reduction Behavior KW - Sex Behavior KW - Students KW - Youth SP - 190 EP - 4 JF - Family planning perspectives JO - Fam Plann Perspect VL - 31 IS - 4 N2 - CONTEXT: Teenagers are exposed to two potentially conflicting sexual health messages, one emphasizing the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and the other stressing pregnancy prevention. To protect teenagers from both STDs and unwanted pregnancy, it is important to know what method choices they make and why. METHODS: Data from a 1997 national survey of 3,550 Australian secondary school students were used to examine teenagers' method choice and patterns of advice-seeking about contraception and STD prevention. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with the exclusive use of condoms or the pill. RESULTS: Virtually all 961 currently sexually active students were using at least one contraceptive method--primarily condoms (78%) or the pill (45%). Some 31% were using condoms exclusively, and 10% were using the pill exclusively. Older students and those who had sought contraceptive advice had elevated odds of using the pill rather than condoms exclusively (odds ratios, 4.4 and 2.6, respectively), while those who had had only casual partners in the last year had a reduced likelihood of exclusive pill rather than condom use (0.1). Furthermore, the more students believed that their peers used condoms, the less likely they were to report exclusive pill use (0.4). Parents were the most frequent source of advice about contraception, followed by physicians and teachers. The most common sources of advice about HIV and other STDs were parents, teachers and then physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Young people must be educated about the distinction between safer sex and contraception, and about how to prevent both STDs and pregnancy. Providing parents with current sexual health information may help to improve young people's sexual health. SN - 0014-7354 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10435218/Conflicting_advice_Australian_adolescents'_use_of_condoms_or_the_pill_ L2 - https://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/journals/3119099.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -