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Respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function of traffic policemen in Thonburi.
J Med Assoc Thai. 1999 May; 82(5):435-43.JM

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess whether traffic policemen working in Thonburi district of Bangkok had poorer respiratory health than the normal Thai population. The benefits of wearing masks as a preventative measure against the respiratory hazards of air pollution were assessed. Traffic policemen (n = 629) who had worked in Thonburi and male subjects (n = 303, the control group) were evaluated for respiratory symptoms using the British Medical Research Council questionnaire. Their pulmonary function was measured by spirometry. Only non-smokers were included in the final analysis and it was found that traffic policemen (n = 242) suffered significantly more cough or phlegm (18.6% vs 7.8%, P = 0.005) and more rhinitis symptoms (17.8% vs 7.8%, P = 0.009) than the control subjects (n = 129). The traffic policemen also had a significantly higher prevalence of abnormal air flow (FEV1 < 80% predicted) than the control group (21.1% vs 12.4%, P = 0.04). The mean values of FEV1 and FVC of the traffic policemen were significantly lower than the control group (3.29 +/- 0.5 L vs 3.43 +/- 0.5 L, P = 0.01 for FEV1 and 3.86 +/- 0.5 L vs 3.98 +/- 0.6 L, P = 0.047 for FVC). Traffic policemen who did not use protective masks had not only a significantly higher prevalence of abnormal FEV1 but also a significantly higher prevalence of abnormal FVC than the control group (35% vs 14%, P = 0.046). They also had higher relative risks of abnormal FEV1 (2.76 vs 1.63) and FVC (2.51 vs 1.23) than those who used protective masks. Multivariate analyses with controlling for age, height, and pack-years of cigarette smoking, revealed that the traffic policemen were significantly and independently associated with lower FEV1 and FVC. In conclusion, the traffic policemen who work in Thonburi have more cough and rhinitis symptoms and lower FEV1 and FVC than the normal Thai population. Traffic policemen who do not use protective masks have higher relative risks of abnormal FEV1 and FVC than those who use them.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10443092

Citation

Wongsurakiat, P, et al. "Respiratory Symptoms and Pulmonary Function of Traffic Policemen in Thonburi." Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet Thangphaet, vol. 82, no. 5, 1999, pp. 435-43.
Wongsurakiat P, Maranetra KN, Nana A, et al. Respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function of traffic policemen in Thonburi. J Med Assoc Thai. 1999;82(5):435-43.
Wongsurakiat, P., Maranetra, K. N., Nana, A., Naruman, C., Aksornint, M., & Chalermsanyakorn, T. (1999). Respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function of traffic policemen in Thonburi. Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet Thangphaet, 82(5), 435-43.
Wongsurakiat P, et al. Respiratory Symptoms and Pulmonary Function of Traffic Policemen in Thonburi. J Med Assoc Thai. 1999;82(5):435-43. PubMed PMID: 10443092.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function of traffic policemen in Thonburi. AU - Wongsurakiat,P, AU - Maranetra,K N, AU - Nana,A, AU - Naruman,C, AU - Aksornint,M, AU - Chalermsanyakorn,T, PY - 1999/8/12/pubmed PY - 1999/8/12/medline PY - 1999/8/12/entrez SP - 435 EP - 43 JF - Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet JO - J Med Assoc Thai VL - 82 IS - 5 N2 - A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess whether traffic policemen working in Thonburi district of Bangkok had poorer respiratory health than the normal Thai population. The benefits of wearing masks as a preventative measure against the respiratory hazards of air pollution were assessed. Traffic policemen (n = 629) who had worked in Thonburi and male subjects (n = 303, the control group) were evaluated for respiratory symptoms using the British Medical Research Council questionnaire. Their pulmonary function was measured by spirometry. Only non-smokers were included in the final analysis and it was found that traffic policemen (n = 242) suffered significantly more cough or phlegm (18.6% vs 7.8%, P = 0.005) and more rhinitis symptoms (17.8% vs 7.8%, P = 0.009) than the control subjects (n = 129). The traffic policemen also had a significantly higher prevalence of abnormal air flow (FEV1 < 80% predicted) than the control group (21.1% vs 12.4%, P = 0.04). The mean values of FEV1 and FVC of the traffic policemen were significantly lower than the control group (3.29 +/- 0.5 L vs 3.43 +/- 0.5 L, P = 0.01 for FEV1 and 3.86 +/- 0.5 L vs 3.98 +/- 0.6 L, P = 0.047 for FVC). Traffic policemen who did not use protective masks had not only a significantly higher prevalence of abnormal FEV1 but also a significantly higher prevalence of abnormal FVC than the control group (35% vs 14%, P = 0.046). They also had higher relative risks of abnormal FEV1 (2.76 vs 1.63) and FVC (2.51 vs 1.23) than those who used protective masks. Multivariate analyses with controlling for age, height, and pack-years of cigarette smoking, revealed that the traffic policemen were significantly and independently associated with lower FEV1 and FVC. In conclusion, the traffic policemen who work in Thonburi have more cough and rhinitis symptoms and lower FEV1 and FVC than the normal Thai population. Traffic policemen who do not use protective masks have higher relative risks of abnormal FEV1 and FVC than those who use them. SN - 0125-2208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10443092/Respiratory_symptoms_and_pulmonary_function_of_traffic_policemen_in_Thonburi_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/occupationalhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -