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Serum copper, zinc and selenium levels with regard to psychological stress in men.
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 1999 Jul; 13(1-2):34-9.JT

Abstract

Serum concentrations of copper (S-Cu), zinc (S-Zn) and selenium (S-Se) were measured in 34 apparently healthy male prisoners of war immediately on release from a detention camp, and 85 healthy male subjects of comparable age and body mass index who had not been in a war combat zone. The results expressed as median and range were: 1138 (877-1337) micrograms/L of S-Cu, 1087 (514-1260) micrograms/L of S-Zn and 53 (30-100) micrograms/L of S-Se in the former prisoners, and 1149 (869-1487) micrograms/L of S-Cu, 1131 (874-1351) micrograms/L of S-Zn and 65 (45-109) micrograms/L of S-Se in the reference subjects. Significantly lower S-Zn (p < 0.02) and S-Se (p < 10(-5)) were found in the former prisoners compared to the reference subjects, whereas no significant difference between the groups was found for S-Cu (p > 0.80). In the group of former prisoners, a significant positive correlation was found between the S-Zn and S-Se levels (r = 0.40, p < 0.05) and an inverse correlation between S-Zn and body mass index (r = -0.34, p < 0.05), whereas no significant correlation was found of S-Cu, S-Zn or S-Se with age (38 (19-54) years) or duration of imprisonment (130 (126-270) days). As the body mass index of 23.4 (19.7-28.1) kg/m2 and the body mass relative deviation from nomogram of 105 (89-125)% in the group of former prisoners showed no indication of malnutrition, lowered S-Zn and S-Se levels may be ascribed to increased psychological stress induced by conditions during imprisonment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10445216

Citation

Pizent, A, et al. "Serum Copper, Zinc and Selenium Levels With Regard to Psychological Stress in Men." Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS), vol. 13, no. 1-2, 1999, pp. 34-9.
Pizent A, Jurasović J, Pavlović M, et al. Serum copper, zinc and selenium levels with regard to psychological stress in men. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 1999;13(1-2):34-9.
Pizent, A., Jurasović, J., Pavlović, M., & Telisman, S. (1999). Serum copper, zinc and selenium levels with regard to psychological stress in men. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS), 13(1-2), 34-9.
Pizent A, et al. Serum Copper, Zinc and Selenium Levels With Regard to Psychological Stress in Men. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 1999;13(1-2):34-9. PubMed PMID: 10445216.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum copper, zinc and selenium levels with regard to psychological stress in men. AU - Pizent,A, AU - Jurasović,J, AU - Pavlović,M, AU - Telisman,S, PY - 1999/8/13/pubmed PY - 1999/8/13/medline PY - 1999/8/13/entrez SP - 34 EP - 9 JF - Journal of trace elements in medicine and biology : organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS) JO - J Trace Elem Med Biol VL - 13 IS - 1-2 N2 - Serum concentrations of copper (S-Cu), zinc (S-Zn) and selenium (S-Se) were measured in 34 apparently healthy male prisoners of war immediately on release from a detention camp, and 85 healthy male subjects of comparable age and body mass index who had not been in a war combat zone. The results expressed as median and range were: 1138 (877-1337) micrograms/L of S-Cu, 1087 (514-1260) micrograms/L of S-Zn and 53 (30-100) micrograms/L of S-Se in the former prisoners, and 1149 (869-1487) micrograms/L of S-Cu, 1131 (874-1351) micrograms/L of S-Zn and 65 (45-109) micrograms/L of S-Se in the reference subjects. Significantly lower S-Zn (p < 0.02) and S-Se (p < 10(-5)) were found in the former prisoners compared to the reference subjects, whereas no significant difference between the groups was found for S-Cu (p > 0.80). In the group of former prisoners, a significant positive correlation was found between the S-Zn and S-Se levels (r = 0.40, p < 0.05) and an inverse correlation between S-Zn and body mass index (r = -0.34, p < 0.05), whereas no significant correlation was found of S-Cu, S-Zn or S-Se with age (38 (19-54) years) or duration of imprisonment (130 (126-270) days). As the body mass index of 23.4 (19.7-28.1) kg/m2 and the body mass relative deviation from nomogram of 105 (89-125)% in the group of former prisoners showed no indication of malnutrition, lowered S-Zn and S-Se levels may be ascribed to increased psychological stress induced by conditions during imprisonment. SN - 0946-672X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10445216/Serum_copper_zinc_and_selenium_levels_with_regard_to_psychological_stress_in_men_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0946-672X(99)80021-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -