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Clinical case definitions for Argentine hemorrhagic fever.
Clin Infect Dis. 1999 May; 28(5):1091-4.CI

Abstract

Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is a potentially lethal infection in Argentina. The case-fatality ratio is >15%, but treatment reduces the mortality rate to <1%. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory criteria, but no case definition has been validated. A chart review was conducted for patients hospitalized with suspected AHF. Individuals with a fourfold rise in antibody titer were classified as cases. The combination of a platelet count of <100,000/mm3 and a white blood cell (WBC) count of <2,500/mm3 had a sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 88%, respectively, thus suggesting that the use of these criteria in a case definition would be helpful for epidemiological studies of AHF. The combination of a platelet count of <100,000/mm3 and a WBC count of <4,000/mm3 had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 71%; the use of these criteria in a case definition should be helpful for screening patients for therapy with immune plasma in the region where AHF is endemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pennsylvania 15261, USA. lharriso@edc.gsph.pitt.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10452640

Citation

Harrison, L H., et al. "Clinical Case Definitions for Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 28, no. 5, 1999, pp. 1091-4.
Harrison LH, Halsey NA, McKee KT, et al. Clinical case definitions for Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Clin Infect Dis. 1999;28(5):1091-4.
Harrison, L. H., Halsey, N. A., McKee, K. T., Peters, C. J., Barrera Oro, J. G., Briggiler, A. M., Feuillade, M. R., & Maiztegui, J. I. (1999). Clinical case definitions for Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 28(5), 1091-4.
Harrison LH, et al. Clinical Case Definitions for Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever. Clin Infect Dis. 1999;28(5):1091-4. PubMed PMID: 10452640.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical case definitions for Argentine hemorrhagic fever. AU - Harrison,L H, AU - Halsey,N A, AU - McKee,K T,Jr AU - Peters,C J, AU - Barrera Oro,J G, AU - Briggiler,A M, AU - Feuillade,M R, AU - Maiztegui,J I, PY - 1999/8/19/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1999/8/19/entrez SP - 1091 EP - 4 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 28 IS - 5 N2 - Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is a potentially lethal infection in Argentina. The case-fatality ratio is >15%, but treatment reduces the mortality rate to <1%. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory criteria, but no case definition has been validated. A chart review was conducted for patients hospitalized with suspected AHF. Individuals with a fourfold rise in antibody titer were classified as cases. The combination of a platelet count of <100,000/mm3 and a white blood cell (WBC) count of <2,500/mm3 had a sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 88%, respectively, thus suggesting that the use of these criteria in a case definition would be helpful for epidemiological studies of AHF. The combination of a platelet count of <100,000/mm3 and a WBC count of <4,000/mm3 had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 71%; the use of these criteria in a case definition should be helpful for screening patients for therapy with immune plasma in the region where AHF is endemic. SN - 1058-4838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10452640/Clinical_case_definitions_for_Argentine_hemorrhagic_fever_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/514749 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -