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Transfer of dietary conjugated linoleic acid to egg yolks of chickens.
Poult Sci. 1999 Aug; 78(8):1138-50.PS

Abstract

There is interest in increasing the conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of foods because of purported benefits of CLA for human health. Two experiments were conducted to determine the influence of dietary CLA concentration on CLA content of eggs. In Experiment 1, diets containing 0, 0.5, 2.5, or 5.0% CLA were fed to 26-wk-old White Leghorn hens (Hy-Line W-77) for 29 d. No CLA was detected in the yolk lipids of hens fed the control diet. Concentration of CLA in the yolk lipids linearly increased as dietary CLA increased. The maximum concentrations of CLA in the yolk lipids of hens fed 0.5, 2.5, or 5.0% CLA occurred 11 d after the start of the experiment and were 0.82, 5.82, and 11.20% of the total fatty acids, respectively. Concurrent decreases were observed in concentrations of C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, C20:4, and C22:6. Rate of egg production, body weight gain, and feed intake were not affected by dietary CLA. Average weights of eggs and yolks were decreased for hens fed 5.0% CLA compared with other dietary treatments. In Experiment 2, 62-wk-old hens were fed diets containing 0 or 5.0% CLA. Maximum CLA concentration in the yolk lipids of hens fed 5.0% CLA was less (7.43%) than that observed in Experiment 1. Feeding 5.0% CLA decreased feed intake but did not affect rate of egg production, weight of eggs, albumens, or yolks, or body weight gain through 36 d. Results of these experiments show that eggs produced by hens fed 5.0% CLA will contain 310 to 365 mg of CLA per egg. Such eggs could provide a substantial amount of CLA source in human foods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames 50011-3150, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10472840

Citation

Chamruspollert, M, and J L. Sell. "Transfer of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid to Egg Yolks of Chickens." Poultry Science, vol. 78, no. 8, 1999, pp. 1138-50.
Chamruspollert M, Sell JL. Transfer of dietary conjugated linoleic acid to egg yolks of chickens. Poult Sci. 1999;78(8):1138-50.
Chamruspollert, M., & Sell, J. L. (1999). Transfer of dietary conjugated linoleic acid to egg yolks of chickens. Poultry Science, 78(8), 1138-50.
Chamruspollert M, Sell JL. Transfer of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid to Egg Yolks of Chickens. Poult Sci. 1999;78(8):1138-50. PubMed PMID: 10472840.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transfer of dietary conjugated linoleic acid to egg yolks of chickens. AU - Chamruspollert,M, AU - Sell,J L, PY - 1999/9/3/pubmed PY - 1999/9/3/medline PY - 1999/9/3/entrez SP - 1138 EP - 50 JF - Poultry science JO - Poult Sci VL - 78 IS - 8 N2 - There is interest in increasing the conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of foods because of purported benefits of CLA for human health. Two experiments were conducted to determine the influence of dietary CLA concentration on CLA content of eggs. In Experiment 1, diets containing 0, 0.5, 2.5, or 5.0% CLA were fed to 26-wk-old White Leghorn hens (Hy-Line W-77) for 29 d. No CLA was detected in the yolk lipids of hens fed the control diet. Concentration of CLA in the yolk lipids linearly increased as dietary CLA increased. The maximum concentrations of CLA in the yolk lipids of hens fed 0.5, 2.5, or 5.0% CLA occurred 11 d after the start of the experiment and were 0.82, 5.82, and 11.20% of the total fatty acids, respectively. Concurrent decreases were observed in concentrations of C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, C20:4, and C22:6. Rate of egg production, body weight gain, and feed intake were not affected by dietary CLA. Average weights of eggs and yolks were decreased for hens fed 5.0% CLA compared with other dietary treatments. In Experiment 2, 62-wk-old hens were fed diets containing 0 or 5.0% CLA. Maximum CLA concentration in the yolk lipids of hens fed 5.0% CLA was less (7.43%) than that observed in Experiment 1. Feeding 5.0% CLA decreased feed intake but did not affect rate of egg production, weight of eggs, albumens, or yolks, or body weight gain through 36 d. Results of these experiments show that eggs produced by hens fed 5.0% CLA will contain 310 to 365 mg of CLA per egg. Such eggs could provide a substantial amount of CLA source in human foods. SN - 0032-5791 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10472840/Transfer_of_dietary_conjugated_linoleic_acid_to_egg_yolks_of_chickens_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0032-5791(19)41058-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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