Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Childhood iron deficiency anemia, maternal nutritional knowledge, and maternal feeding practices in a high-risk population.
Prev Med. 1999 Sep; 29(3):152-6.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Despite the proven success of national efforts such as the Special Supplementary Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) to curb childhood iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in the United States, aggregate programmatic data may not accurately represent the experience of particularly high risk groups, such as the children of adolescent mothers of low socio-economic status.

METHODS

This study evaluated the prevalence and severity of childhood anemia and associated risk factors, at one urban teen health center serving primarily low-income adolescent mothers and their children. A total of 175 pediatric WIC charts were reviewed to abstract hemoglobin status and other data. Additionally, 81 mothers were interviewed with regard to their nutritional knowledge and feeding practices; these findings were compared with the measured hemoglobin (Hgb) of their children.

RESULTS

A total of 34.9% of children in the study population were found to be anemic (Hgb </= 11. 2). Low childhood Hgb status was significantly correlated with racial identification, child age, maternal perception of feeding difficulty, and the presence of concurrent pediatric medical illness. Report of extensive nutritional discussion with a physician was correlated with normal Hgb levels. No differences in nutritional knowledge or feeding practices were detected between mothers of children with low iron status.

CONCLUSIONS

We conclude that the risk of iron deficiency, even among children receiving WIC services, may be underestimated in certain "nutritionally very high risk" populations. Further study of interventions for IDA in children of young, low-income mothers is recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Michigan Medical School and the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, 48109, Michigan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10479602

Citation

Gupta, S, et al. "Childhood Iron Deficiency Anemia, Maternal Nutritional Knowledge, and Maternal Feeding Practices in a High-risk Population." Preventive Medicine, vol. 29, no. 3, 1999, pp. 152-6.
Gupta S, Venkateswaran R, Gorenflo DW, et al. Childhood iron deficiency anemia, maternal nutritional knowledge, and maternal feeding practices in a high-risk population. Prev Med. 1999;29(3):152-6.
Gupta, S., Venkateswaran, R., Gorenflo, D. W., & Eyler, A. E. (1999). Childhood iron deficiency anemia, maternal nutritional knowledge, and maternal feeding practices in a high-risk population. Preventive Medicine, 29(3), 152-6.
Gupta S, et al. Childhood Iron Deficiency Anemia, Maternal Nutritional Knowledge, and Maternal Feeding Practices in a High-risk Population. Prev Med. 1999;29(3):152-6. PubMed PMID: 10479602.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Childhood iron deficiency anemia, maternal nutritional knowledge, and maternal feeding practices in a high-risk population. AU - Gupta,S, AU - Venkateswaran,R, AU - Gorenflo,D W, AU - Eyler,A E, PY - 1999/9/10/pubmed PY - 1999/9/10/medline PY - 1999/9/10/entrez SP - 152 EP - 6 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite the proven success of national efforts such as the Special Supplementary Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) to curb childhood iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in the United States, aggregate programmatic data may not accurately represent the experience of particularly high risk groups, such as the children of adolescent mothers of low socio-economic status. METHODS: This study evaluated the prevalence and severity of childhood anemia and associated risk factors, at one urban teen health center serving primarily low-income adolescent mothers and their children. A total of 175 pediatric WIC charts were reviewed to abstract hemoglobin status and other data. Additionally, 81 mothers were interviewed with regard to their nutritional knowledge and feeding practices; these findings were compared with the measured hemoglobin (Hgb) of their children. RESULTS: A total of 34.9% of children in the study population were found to be anemic (Hgb </= 11. 2). Low childhood Hgb status was significantly correlated with racial identification, child age, maternal perception of feeding difficulty, and the presence of concurrent pediatric medical illness. Report of extensive nutritional discussion with a physician was correlated with normal Hgb levels. No differences in nutritional knowledge or feeding practices were detected between mothers of children with low iron status. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the risk of iron deficiency, even among children receiving WIC services, may be underestimated in certain "nutritionally very high risk" populations. Further study of interventions for IDA in children of young, low-income mothers is recommended. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10479602/Childhood_iron_deficiency_anemia_maternal_nutritional_knowledge_and_maternal_feeding_practices_in_a_high_risk_population_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(99)90522-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -