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Dietary fatty acids and allergy.
Ann Med 1999; 31(4):282-7AM

Abstract

The increase in the prevalence of atopic diseases has recently been linked to altered consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). As typical Western diets contain almost 10 times more linoleic acid (18:2 omega-6) than alpha-linolenic acid (18:3 omega-3), it is the metabolism of the former that predominates. Subsequently produced arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids alter the balance of T-helper cells type 1 and type 2 thus favouring the production of immunoglobulin (Ig)E. In atopic subjects, the impact of this excessive eicosanoid production may be further strengthened as a result of changes in cyclic nucleotide metabolism exacerbated by substrate availability. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids can have marked influence on both specific and nonspecific immune responses in modifying eicosanoid production and replacing omega-6 fatty acids in cell membranes. Therefore, it is concluded that careful manipulation of dietary PUFAs may play a key role in the successful management of inflammation associated with atopic diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biochemistry and Food Chemistry, University of Turku, Finland. pasi.kankaanpaa@utu.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10480759

Citation

Kankaanpää, P, et al. "Dietary Fatty Acids and Allergy." Annals of Medicine, vol. 31, no. 4, 1999, pp. 282-7.
Kankaanpää P, Sütas Y, Salminen S, et al. Dietary fatty acids and allergy. Ann Med. 1999;31(4):282-7.
Kankaanpää, P., Sütas, Y., Salminen, S., Lichtenstein, A., & Isolauri, E. (1999). Dietary fatty acids and allergy. Annals of Medicine, 31(4), pp. 282-7.
Kankaanpää P, et al. Dietary Fatty Acids and Allergy. Ann Med. 1999;31(4):282-7. PubMed PMID: 10480759.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fatty acids and allergy. AU - Kankaanpää,P, AU - Sütas,Y, AU - Salminen,S, AU - Lichtenstein,A, AU - Isolauri,E, PY - 1999/9/10/pubmed PY - 1999/9/10/medline PY - 1999/9/10/entrez SP - 282 EP - 7 JF - Annals of medicine JO - Ann. Med. VL - 31 IS - 4 N2 - The increase in the prevalence of atopic diseases has recently been linked to altered consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). As typical Western diets contain almost 10 times more linoleic acid (18:2 omega-6) than alpha-linolenic acid (18:3 omega-3), it is the metabolism of the former that predominates. Subsequently produced arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids alter the balance of T-helper cells type 1 and type 2 thus favouring the production of immunoglobulin (Ig)E. In atopic subjects, the impact of this excessive eicosanoid production may be further strengthened as a result of changes in cyclic nucleotide metabolism exacerbated by substrate availability. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids can have marked influence on both specific and nonspecific immune responses in modifying eicosanoid production and replacing omega-6 fatty acids in cell membranes. Therefore, it is concluded that careful manipulation of dietary PUFAs may play a key role in the successful management of inflammation associated with atopic diseases. SN - 0785-3890 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10480759/full_citation L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/07853899908995891 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -