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Sexually transmitted infections in young pregnant women in Bangui, Central African Republic.
Int J STD AIDS. 1999 Sep; 10(9):609-14.IJ

Abstract

In early 1996, 481 women visiting the antenatal services of the 3 major governmental health centres in the capital city of the Central African Republic (CAR) were included in the study. All study participants underwent the health centre's routine gynaecological examination, including laboratory diagnosis of trichomoniasis, candidiasis, gonorrhoea, syphilis and bacterial vaginosis. Cervical secretions and blood samples from study participants were sent to the National STD Reference Centre for diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Candida albicans, Treponema pallidum, and HIV. Overall, 34% of the study women were diagnosed with at least one sexually transmitted infection (STI) (3.1% N. gonorrhoeae, 6.2% C. trachomatis, 9.9% T. vaginalis, 6.7% T. pallidum, 12.2% HIV-1). In addition, 29.1% of women were diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis and 46.6% with candidiasis. Only a small proportion of these women had sought treatment during the weeks before, despite the recognition of genital symptoms. Self-reported and health worker-recognized symptoms, signs and laboratory results exhibited only low sensitivities, specificities, and positive predictive values in the diagnosis of STIs. These findings confirm the high vulnerability of young African women to STIs and emphasize the need for specific control interventions which should include affordable and user-friendly services. Moreover, these results call for more effective quality control in case of laboratory-based STI control strategies and question the validity of syndromic STI management strategies in women attending antenatal care services in Africa.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit, Eschborn, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10492429

Citation

Blankhart, D, et al. "Sexually Transmitted Infections in Young Pregnant Women in Bangui, Central African Republic." International Journal of STD & AIDS, vol. 10, no. 9, 1999, pp. 609-14.
Blankhart D, Müller O, Gresenguet G, et al. Sexually transmitted infections in young pregnant women in Bangui, Central African Republic. Int J STD AIDS. 1999;10(9):609-14.
Blankhart, D., Müller, O., Gresenguet, G., & Weis, P. (1999). Sexually transmitted infections in young pregnant women in Bangui, Central African Republic. International Journal of STD & AIDS, 10(9), 609-14.
Blankhart D, et al. Sexually Transmitted Infections in Young Pregnant Women in Bangui, Central African Republic. Int J STD AIDS. 1999;10(9):609-14. PubMed PMID: 10492429.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sexually transmitted infections in young pregnant women in Bangui, Central African Republic. AU - Blankhart,D, AU - Müller,O, AU - Gresenguet,G, AU - Weis,P, PY - 1999/9/24/pubmed PY - 1999/9/24/medline PY - 1999/9/24/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Central African Republic KW - Clinical Research KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Examinations And Diagnoses KW - French Speaking Africa KW - Hiv Infections KW - Infections KW - Laboratory Examinations And Diagnoses KW - Measurement KW - Middle Africa KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Pregnant Women KW - Prevalence KW - Reproductive Tract Infections KW - Research Methodology KW - Research Report KW - Sexually Transmitted Diseases KW - Signs And Symptoms KW - Viral Diseases SP - 609 EP - 14 JF - International journal of STD & AIDS JO - Int J STD AIDS VL - 10 IS - 9 N2 - In early 1996, 481 women visiting the antenatal services of the 3 major governmental health centres in the capital city of the Central African Republic (CAR) were included in the study. All study participants underwent the health centre's routine gynaecological examination, including laboratory diagnosis of trichomoniasis, candidiasis, gonorrhoea, syphilis and bacterial vaginosis. Cervical secretions and blood samples from study participants were sent to the National STD Reference Centre for diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Candida albicans, Treponema pallidum, and HIV. Overall, 34% of the study women were diagnosed with at least one sexually transmitted infection (STI) (3.1% N. gonorrhoeae, 6.2% C. trachomatis, 9.9% T. vaginalis, 6.7% T. pallidum, 12.2% HIV-1). In addition, 29.1% of women were diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis and 46.6% with candidiasis. Only a small proportion of these women had sought treatment during the weeks before, despite the recognition of genital symptoms. Self-reported and health worker-recognized symptoms, signs and laboratory results exhibited only low sensitivities, specificities, and positive predictive values in the diagnosis of STIs. These findings confirm the high vulnerability of young African women to STIs and emphasize the need for specific control interventions which should include affordable and user-friendly services. Moreover, these results call for more effective quality control in case of laboratory-based STI control strategies and question the validity of syndromic STI management strategies in women attending antenatal care services in Africa. SN - 0956-4624 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10492429/Sexually_transmitted_infections_in_young_pregnant_women_in_Bangui_Central_African_Republic_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1258/0956462991914753?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -