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Management of tinea capitis. A status report.
Postgrad Med. 1999 Jul; Spec No:38-45.PM

Abstract

Tinea capitis is the most common pediatric fungal infection, usually affecting school-age children. It is caused by a dermatophyte from the genus Trichophyton or Microsporum. The predominant pathogens vary according to geographic location. Infection rates are higher in urban regions, especially those with overcrowded living conditions. In the United States, the incidence is highest among African-American children and appears to be significantly lower among Asian Americans. Tinea capitis may persist into adulthood, especially in females with Trichophyton tonsurans infection. Tinea capitis also has been reported in neonates, infants, and elderly patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Nevada School of Medicine, Las Vegas, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10492665

Citation

Del Rosso, J Q., and A K. Gupta. "Management of Tinea Capitis. a Status Report." Postgraduate Medicine, vol. Spec No, 1999, pp. 38-45.
Del Rosso JQ, Gupta AK. Management of tinea capitis. A status report. Postgrad Med. 1999;Spec No:38-45.
Del Rosso, J. Q., & Gupta, A. K. (1999). Management of tinea capitis. A status report. Postgraduate Medicine, Spec No, 38-45.
Del Rosso JQ, Gupta AK. Management of Tinea Capitis. a Status Report. Postgrad Med. 1999;Spec No:38-45. PubMed PMID: 10492665.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Management of tinea capitis. A status report. AU - Del Rosso,J Q, AU - Gupta,A K, PY - 1999/9/24/pubmed PY - 1999/9/24/medline PY - 1999/9/24/entrez SP - 38 EP - 45 JF - Postgraduate medicine JO - Postgrad Med VL - Spec No N2 - Tinea capitis is the most common pediatric fungal infection, usually affecting school-age children. It is caused by a dermatophyte from the genus Trichophyton or Microsporum. The predominant pathogens vary according to geographic location. Infection rates are higher in urban regions, especially those with overcrowded living conditions. In the United States, the incidence is highest among African-American children and appears to be significantly lower among Asian Americans. Tinea capitis may persist into adulthood, especially in females with Trichophyton tonsurans infection. Tinea capitis also has been reported in neonates, infants, and elderly patients. SN - 0032-5481 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10492665/Management_of_tinea_capitis__A_status_report_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -