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Menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors.
Oncol Nurs Forum 1999; 26(8):1311-7ON

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES

To examine the prevalence and severity of menopausal symptoms among breast cancer survivors and the relationship between menopausal symptoms and quality of life (QOL).

DESIGN

Cross-sectional, descriptive.

SETTING

Outpatient breast care center servicing a southeastern city and regional rural areas.

SAMPLE

114 postmenopausal breast cancer survivors with a mean age of 59 years (SD = 10; range = 36-83 years) who were a mean of 34.9 months postcompletion of surgery, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy (SD = 22; range = 4-116 months).

METHODS

Telephone interviews were used to assess demographic variables, menopausal status (questions adapted from the Massachusetts Women's Health Study), menopausal symptoms (adapted from the Blatt Menopausal Index), and QOL (SF-12 Health Survey). Disease and treatment information was extracted from medical records and the state cancer registry.

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES

Menopausal status, menopausal symptoms, and QOL.

FINDINGS

The most commonly reported menopausal symptoms (joint pain (77%), feeling tired (75%), trouble sleeping (68%), and hot flashes (66%)) were also the most severe. More than 40% of breast cancer survivors who reported these symptoms rated them as "quite a bit" to "extremely" severe. The total number and severity of symptoms reported was significantly related to the number of years postmenopause but not to time postdiagnosis. Higher prevalence and severity of menopausal symptoms were related to lower physical and emotional QOL.

CONCLUSIONS

Menopausal symptoms appear to be a significant problem for breast cancer survivors.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE

Nurses can inform women that menopausal symptoms may be experienced following breast cancer treatment and that these symptoms may be more severe than those experienced by healthy women without cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. janet.s.carpenter@mcmail.vanderbilt.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10497770

Citation

Carpenter, J S., and M A. Andrykowski. "Menopausal Symptoms in Breast Cancer Survivors." Oncology Nursing Forum, vol. 26, no. 8, 1999, pp. 1311-7.
Carpenter JS, Andrykowski MA. Menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors. Oncol Nurs Forum. 1999;26(8):1311-7.
Carpenter, J. S., & Andrykowski, M. A. (1999). Menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors. Oncology Nursing Forum, 26(8), pp. 1311-7.
Carpenter JS, Andrykowski MA. Menopausal Symptoms in Breast Cancer Survivors. Oncol Nurs Forum. 1999;26(8):1311-7. PubMed PMID: 10497770.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors. AU - Carpenter,J S, AU - Andrykowski,M A, PY - 1999/9/25/pubmed PY - 1999/9/25/medline PY - 1999/9/25/entrez SP - 1311 EP - 7 JF - Oncology nursing forum JO - Oncol Nurs Forum VL - 26 IS - 8 N2 - PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence and severity of menopausal symptoms among breast cancer survivors and the relationship between menopausal symptoms and quality of life (QOL). DESIGN: Cross-sectional, descriptive. SETTING: Outpatient breast care center servicing a southeastern city and regional rural areas. SAMPLE: 114 postmenopausal breast cancer survivors with a mean age of 59 years (SD = 10; range = 36-83 years) who were a mean of 34.9 months postcompletion of surgery, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy (SD = 22; range = 4-116 months). METHODS: Telephone interviews were used to assess demographic variables, menopausal status (questions adapted from the Massachusetts Women's Health Study), menopausal symptoms (adapted from the Blatt Menopausal Index), and QOL (SF-12 Health Survey). Disease and treatment information was extracted from medical records and the state cancer registry. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Menopausal status, menopausal symptoms, and QOL. FINDINGS: The most commonly reported menopausal symptoms (joint pain (77%), feeling tired (75%), trouble sleeping (68%), and hot flashes (66%)) were also the most severe. More than 40% of breast cancer survivors who reported these symptoms rated them as "quite a bit" to "extremely" severe. The total number and severity of symptoms reported was significantly related to the number of years postmenopause but not to time postdiagnosis. Higher prevalence and severity of menopausal symptoms were related to lower physical and emotional QOL. CONCLUSIONS: Menopausal symptoms appear to be a significant problem for breast cancer survivors. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Nurses can inform women that menopausal symptoms may be experienced following breast cancer treatment and that these symptoms may be more severe than those experienced by healthy women without cancer. SN - 0190-535X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10497770/Menopausal_symptoms_in_breast_cancer_survivors_ L2 - https://ClinicalTrials.gov/search/term=10497770 [PUBMED-IDS] DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -