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Parental occupational exposure to hydrocarbons and risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia in offspring.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1999 Sep; 8(9):783-91.CE

Abstract

Parental exposure to hydrocarbons at work has been suggested to increase the risk of childhood leukemia. Evidence, however, is not entirely consistent. Very few studies have evaluated the potential parental occupational hazards by exposure time windows. The Children's Cancer Group recently completed a large-scale case-control study involving 1842 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) cases and 1986 matched controls. The study examined the association of self-reported occupational exposure to various hydrocarbons among parents with risk of childhood ALL by exposure time window, immunophenotype of ALL, and age at diagnosis. We found that maternal exposure to solvents [odds ratio (OR), 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3-2.5] and paints or thinners (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.2) during the preconception period (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.3) and during pregnancy (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.3) and to plastic materials during the postnatal period (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0-4.7) were related to an increased risk of childhood ALL. A positive association between ALL and paternal exposure to plastic materials during the preconception period was also found (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.9). The ALL risk associated with parental exposures to hydrocarbons did not vary greatly with immunophenotype of ALL. These results suggest that the effect of parental occupational exposure to hydrocarbons on offspring may depend on the type of hydrocarbon and the timing of the exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55454, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10498397

Citation

Shu, X O., et al. "Parental Occupational Exposure to Hydrocarbons and Risk of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia in Offspring." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 8, no. 9, 1999, pp. 783-91.
Shu XO, Stewart P, Wen WQ, et al. Parental occupational exposure to hydrocarbons and risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia in offspring. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1999;8(9):783-91.
Shu, X. O., Stewart, P., Wen, W. Q., Han, D., Potter, J. D., Buckley, J. D., Heineman, E., & Robison, L. L. (1999). Parental occupational exposure to hydrocarbons and risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia in offspring. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 8(9), 783-91.
Shu XO, et al. Parental Occupational Exposure to Hydrocarbons and Risk of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia in Offspring. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1999;8(9):783-91. PubMed PMID: 10498397.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parental occupational exposure to hydrocarbons and risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia in offspring. AU - Shu,X O, AU - Stewart,P, AU - Wen,W Q, AU - Han,D, AU - Potter,J D, AU - Buckley,J D, AU - Heineman,E, AU - Robison,L L, PY - 1999/9/25/pubmed PY - 1999/9/25/medline PY - 1999/9/25/entrez SP - 783 EP - 91 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev VL - 8 IS - 9 N2 - Parental exposure to hydrocarbons at work has been suggested to increase the risk of childhood leukemia. Evidence, however, is not entirely consistent. Very few studies have evaluated the potential parental occupational hazards by exposure time windows. The Children's Cancer Group recently completed a large-scale case-control study involving 1842 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) cases and 1986 matched controls. The study examined the association of self-reported occupational exposure to various hydrocarbons among parents with risk of childhood ALL by exposure time window, immunophenotype of ALL, and age at diagnosis. We found that maternal exposure to solvents [odds ratio (OR), 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3-2.5] and paints or thinners (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.2) during the preconception period (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.3) and during pregnancy (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.3) and to plastic materials during the postnatal period (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0-4.7) were related to an increased risk of childhood ALL. A positive association between ALL and paternal exposure to plastic materials during the preconception period was also found (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.9). The ALL risk associated with parental exposures to hydrocarbons did not vary greatly with immunophenotype of ALL. These results suggest that the effect of parental occupational exposure to hydrocarbons on offspring may depend on the type of hydrocarbon and the timing of the exposure. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10498397/Parental_occupational_exposure_to_hydrocarbons_and_risk_of_acute_lymphocytic_leukemia_in_offspring_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=10498397 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -