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A prospective study of carotenoid and vitamin A intakes and risk of cataract extraction in US women.
Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Oct; 70(4):509-16.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Oxidation of lens proteins plays a central role in the formation of age-related cataracts, suggesting that dietary antioxidants may play a role in prevention. However, the relation between specific antioxidants and risk of cataract remains uncertain.

OBJECTIVE

Our objective was to examine prospectively the association between carotenoid and vitamin A intakes and cataract extraction in women.

METHODS

A prospective cohort of registered female nurses aged 45-71 y and free of diagnosed cancer was followed; in 1980, 50461 were included and others were added as they became 45 y of age for a total of 77466. Information on nutrient intake was assessed by repeated administration of a food-frequency questionnaire during 12 y of follow-up.

RESULTS

During 761762 person-years of follow-up, 1471 cataracts were extracted. After age, smoking, and other potential cataract risk factors were controlled for, those with the highest intake of lutein and zeaxanthin had a 22% decreased risk of cataract extraction compared with those in the lowest quintile (relative risk: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.95; P for trend = 0.04). Other carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, and beta-cryptoxanthin), vitamin A, and retinol were not associated with cataract in multivariate analysis. Increasing frequency of intakes of spinach and kale, foods rich in lutein, was associated with a moderate decrease in risk of cataract.

CONCLUSIONS

Lutein and zeaxanthin and foods rich in these carotenoids may decrease the risk of cataracts severe enough to require extraction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 01003, USA. LCT@schoolph.umass.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10500020

Citation

Chasan-Taber, L, et al. "A Prospective Study of Carotenoid and Vitamin a Intakes and Risk of Cataract Extraction in US Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 70, no. 4, 1999, pp. 509-16.
Chasan-Taber L, Willett WC, Seddon JM, et al. A prospective study of carotenoid and vitamin A intakes and risk of cataract extraction in US women. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;70(4):509-16.
Chasan-Taber, L., Willett, W. C., Seddon, J. M., Stampfer, M. J., Rosner, B., Colditz, G. A., Speizer, F. E., & Hankinson, S. E. (1999). A prospective study of carotenoid and vitamin A intakes and risk of cataract extraction in US women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 70(4), 509-16.
Chasan-Taber L, et al. A Prospective Study of Carotenoid and Vitamin a Intakes and Risk of Cataract Extraction in US Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;70(4):509-16. PubMed PMID: 10500020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of carotenoid and vitamin A intakes and risk of cataract extraction in US women. AU - Chasan-Taber,L, AU - Willett,W C, AU - Seddon,J M, AU - Stampfer,M J, AU - Rosner,B, AU - Colditz,G A, AU - Speizer,F E, AU - Hankinson,S E, PY - 1999/9/29/pubmed PY - 1999/9/29/medline PY - 1999/9/29/entrez SP - 509 EP - 16 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 70 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Oxidation of lens proteins plays a central role in the formation of age-related cataracts, suggesting that dietary antioxidants may play a role in prevention. However, the relation between specific antioxidants and risk of cataract remains uncertain. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine prospectively the association between carotenoid and vitamin A intakes and cataract extraction in women. METHODS: A prospective cohort of registered female nurses aged 45-71 y and free of diagnosed cancer was followed; in 1980, 50461 were included and others were added as they became 45 y of age for a total of 77466. Information on nutrient intake was assessed by repeated administration of a food-frequency questionnaire during 12 y of follow-up. RESULTS: During 761762 person-years of follow-up, 1471 cataracts were extracted. After age, smoking, and other potential cataract risk factors were controlled for, those with the highest intake of lutein and zeaxanthin had a 22% decreased risk of cataract extraction compared with those in the lowest quintile (relative risk: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.95; P for trend = 0.04). Other carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, and beta-cryptoxanthin), vitamin A, and retinol were not associated with cataract in multivariate analysis. Increasing frequency of intakes of spinach and kale, foods rich in lutein, was associated with a moderate decrease in risk of cataract. CONCLUSIONS: Lutein and zeaxanthin and foods rich in these carotenoids may decrease the risk of cataracts severe enough to require extraction. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10500020/A_prospective_study_of_carotenoid_and_vitamin_A_intakes_and_risk_of_cataract_extraction_in_US_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/70.4.509 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -