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Prevalence of malnutrition in Kenya.
East Afr Med J. 1999 Jul; 76(7):376-80.EA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prevalence of malnutrition among pre-school children can be used to determine the need for nutrition surveillance, nutritional care, or appropriate nutritional intervention programmes. Such data also indicate the target groups and where interventions are required.

OBJECTIVE

To determine the at risk groups, extent and magnitude, and regional distribution of malnutrition.

DESIGN

A cross sectional study.

SETTING

The survey was conducted in 14 districts representative of the eight provinces of Kenya.

SUBJECTS

Six thousand, four hundred and nineteen children (3294 males and 3125 females) aged six to 72 months selected using the cluster sampling technique from eight provinces were studied.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Anthropometric measures of height/length and weight were used to do the assessment.

RESULTS

The prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight were 37%, 6% and 27% respectively. Stunting was highest among the 12-23 months age group (44.8%). A statistically significant difference (p = < 0.005) was found between boys and girls with regard to stunting. This difference was more remarkable when the two were stratified by age group where 29% of the boys were stunted compared to 20% of the girls. Geographically, it was found that there exists great regional disparities with a low (22.6%) in Kiambu and a high (56.5%) in Kwale districts.

CONCLUSION

These results show that malnutrition is still a serious public health problem in Kenya and requires urgent attention. The problem since the first survey in 1977 shows an upward trend, suggesting deterioration over the years. Well thought out and targeted intervention programmes are long overdue. The results of this survey and others emphasize the importance of having a well established surveillance system which would ensure necessary and timely action.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Behavioural Sciences, Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10520364

Citation

Ngare, D K., and J N. Muttunga. "Prevalence of Malnutrition in Kenya." East African Medical Journal, vol. 76, no. 7, 1999, pp. 376-80.
Ngare DK, Muttunga JN. Prevalence of malnutrition in Kenya. East Afr Med J. 1999;76(7):376-80.
Ngare, D. K., & Muttunga, J. N. (1999). Prevalence of malnutrition in Kenya. East African Medical Journal, 76(7), 376-80.
Ngare DK, Muttunga JN. Prevalence of Malnutrition in Kenya. East Afr Med J. 1999;76(7):376-80. PubMed PMID: 10520364.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of malnutrition in Kenya. AU - Ngare,D K, AU - Muttunga,J N, PY - 1999/10/16/pubmed PY - 1999/10/16/medline PY - 1999/10/16/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Age Factors KW - Cross Sectional Analysis KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Eastern Africa KW - English Speaking Africa KW - Health KW - Infant KW - Infant Nutrition KW - Kenya KW - Malnutrition KW - Measurement KW - Nutrition KW - Nutrition Disorders KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Prevalence KW - Research Methodology KW - Research Report KW - Youth SP - 376 EP - 80 JF - East African medical journal JO - East Afr Med J VL - 76 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Prevalence of malnutrition among pre-school children can be used to determine the need for nutrition surveillance, nutritional care, or appropriate nutritional intervention programmes. Such data also indicate the target groups and where interventions are required. OBJECTIVE: To determine the at risk groups, extent and magnitude, and regional distribution of malnutrition. DESIGN: A cross sectional study. SETTING: The survey was conducted in 14 districts representative of the eight provinces of Kenya. SUBJECTS: Six thousand, four hundred and nineteen children (3294 males and 3125 females) aged six to 72 months selected using the cluster sampling technique from eight provinces were studied. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anthropometric measures of height/length and weight were used to do the assessment. RESULTS: The prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight were 37%, 6% and 27% respectively. Stunting was highest among the 12-23 months age group (44.8%). A statistically significant difference (p = < 0.005) was found between boys and girls with regard to stunting. This difference was more remarkable when the two were stratified by age group where 29% of the boys were stunted compared to 20% of the girls. Geographically, it was found that there exists great regional disparities with a low (22.6%) in Kiambu and a high (56.5%) in Kwale districts. CONCLUSION: These results show that malnutrition is still a serious public health problem in Kenya and requires urgent attention. The problem since the first survey in 1977 shows an upward trend, suggesting deterioration over the years. Well thought out and targeted intervention programmes are long overdue. The results of this survey and others emphasize the importance of having a well established surveillance system which would ensure necessary and timely action. SN - 0012-835X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10520364/Prevalence_of_malnutrition_in_Kenya_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/childnutrition.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -