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Value of PCR for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in aqueous humor and blood samples from immunocompetent patients with ocular toxoplasmosis.
J Clin Microbiol 1999; 37(11):3465-8JC

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii infection is an important cause of chorioretinitis in the United States and Europe. Most cases of Toxoplasma chorioretinitis result from congenital infection. Patients are often asymptomatic during life, with a peak incidence of symptomatic illness in the second and third decades of life. Diagnosis is mainly supported by ophthalmological examination and a good response to installed therapy. However, establishment of a diagnosis by ophthalmological examination alone can be difficult in some cases. To determine the diagnostic value of PCR for the detection of T. gondii, 56 blood and 56 aqueous humor samples from 56 immunocompetent patients were examined. Fifteen patients with a diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis had increased serum anti-T. gondii immunoglobulin G levels but were negative for anti-T. gondii immunoglobulin M (group 1), and 41 patients were used as controls (group 2). Samples were taken before antiparasitic therapy was initiated, and only one blood sample and one aqueous humor sample were obtained for each patient. Single nested PCRs and Southern blot hybridization were performed with DNA extracted from these samples. The results obtained showed sensitivity and specificity values of 53. 3 and 83%, respectively. Interestingly, among all patients with ocular toxoplasmosis, a positive PCR result with the aqueous humor sample was accompanied by a positive PCR result with the blood sample. This result suggests that ocular toxoplasmosis should not be considered a local event, as PCR testing of blood samples from patients with ocular toxoplasmosis yielded the same result as PCR testing of aqueous humor samples. PCR testing may be useful for discriminating between ocular toxoplasmosis and other ocular diseases, and also can avoid the problems associated with ocular puncture.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Servicio de Microbiología, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, 28034 Madrid, Spain. germanbou@mailcity.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10523535

Citation

Bou, G, et al. "Value of PCR for Detection of Toxoplasma Gondii in Aqueous Humor and Blood Samples From Immunocompetent Patients With Ocular Toxoplasmosis." Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 37, no. 11, 1999, pp. 3465-8.
Bou G, Figueroa MS, Martí-Belda P, et al. Value of PCR for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in aqueous humor and blood samples from immunocompetent patients with ocular toxoplasmosis. J Clin Microbiol. 1999;37(11):3465-8.
Bou, G., Figueroa, M. S., Martí-Belda, P., Navas, E., & Guerrero, A. (1999). Value of PCR for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in aqueous humor and blood samples from immunocompetent patients with ocular toxoplasmosis. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 37(11), pp. 3465-8.
Bou G, et al. Value of PCR for Detection of Toxoplasma Gondii in Aqueous Humor and Blood Samples From Immunocompetent Patients With Ocular Toxoplasmosis. J Clin Microbiol. 1999;37(11):3465-8. PubMed PMID: 10523535.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Value of PCR for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in aqueous humor and blood samples from immunocompetent patients with ocular toxoplasmosis. AU - Bou,G, AU - Figueroa,M S, AU - Martí-Belda,P, AU - Navas,E, AU - Guerrero,A, PY - 1999/10/19/pubmed PY - 1999/10/19/medline PY - 1999/10/19/entrez SP - 3465 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical microbiology JO - J. Clin. Microbiol. VL - 37 IS - 11 N2 - Toxoplasma gondii infection is an important cause of chorioretinitis in the United States and Europe. Most cases of Toxoplasma chorioretinitis result from congenital infection. Patients are often asymptomatic during life, with a peak incidence of symptomatic illness in the second and third decades of life. Diagnosis is mainly supported by ophthalmological examination and a good response to installed therapy. However, establishment of a diagnosis by ophthalmological examination alone can be difficult in some cases. To determine the diagnostic value of PCR for the detection of T. gondii, 56 blood and 56 aqueous humor samples from 56 immunocompetent patients were examined. Fifteen patients with a diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis had increased serum anti-T. gondii immunoglobulin G levels but were negative for anti-T. gondii immunoglobulin M (group 1), and 41 patients were used as controls (group 2). Samples were taken before antiparasitic therapy was initiated, and only one blood sample and one aqueous humor sample were obtained for each patient. Single nested PCRs and Southern blot hybridization were performed with DNA extracted from these samples. The results obtained showed sensitivity and specificity values of 53. 3 and 83%, respectively. Interestingly, among all patients with ocular toxoplasmosis, a positive PCR result with the aqueous humor sample was accompanied by a positive PCR result with the blood sample. This result suggests that ocular toxoplasmosis should not be considered a local event, as PCR testing of blood samples from patients with ocular toxoplasmosis yielded the same result as PCR testing of aqueous humor samples. PCR testing may be useful for discriminating between ocular toxoplasmosis and other ocular diseases, and also can avoid the problems associated with ocular puncture. SN - 0095-1137 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10523535/Value_of_PCR_for_detection_of_Toxoplasma_gondii_in_aqueous_humor_and_blood_samples_from_immunocompetent_patients_with_ocular_toxoplasmosis_ L2 - http://jcm.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=10523535 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -