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Ultra-short-bowel syndrome is not an absolute indication to small-bowel transplantation in childhood.
Eur J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Aug; 9(4):267-70.EJ

Abstract

Short-bowel syndrome (SBS) either in adults or in children is considered as an indication to small-bowel transplantation (SBTx), particularly in its most severe form with a residual bowel length below 20 cm. Among factors likely to worsen the prognosis, more recent reports also indicate the number of surgical interventions, early onset sepsis and early development of liver disease. We report six cases of ultra-short-bowel syndrome followed from birth to verify the importance of various prognostic factors. In our case series, the male sex is predominating (5:1). Intestinal resection was indicated in 3 patients for multiple intestinal atresias, in 2 for volvulus and in 1 for necrotizing enterocolitis. The length of intestine remaining was invariably less than 20 cm and 2 patients had a preserved ileocecal valve. In most cases, more than 50% of the colon remained. The number of abdominal operations ranged from 1 to 4. In almost all cases (5 of 6), sepsis and hepatopathy developed early. Our experience suggests that rather than depending on the length of intestine remaining or the presence of the ileocecal valve, the prognosis of patients with the extreme-short-bowel syndrome depends on recurrent neonatal onset sepsis and early onset liver impairment. In addition, our case review shows that the extreme-short-bowel syndrome is not necessarily an indication for bowel transplantation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, Roma, Italia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10532274

Citation

Gambarara, M, et al. "Ultra-short-bowel Syndrome Is Not an Absolute Indication to Small-bowel Transplantation in Childhood." European Journal of Pediatric Surgery : Official Journal of Austrian Association of Pediatric Surgery ... [et Al] = Zeitschrift Fur Kinderchirurgie, vol. 9, no. 4, 1999, pp. 267-70.
Gambarara M, Ferretti F, Bagolan P, et al. Ultra-short-bowel syndrome is not an absolute indication to small-bowel transplantation in childhood. Eur J Pediatr Surg. 1999;9(4):267-70.
Gambarara, M., Ferretti, F., Bagolan, P., Papadatou, B., Rivosecchi, M., Lucchetti, M. C., Nahom, A., & Castro, M. (1999). Ultra-short-bowel syndrome is not an absolute indication to small-bowel transplantation in childhood. European Journal of Pediatric Surgery : Official Journal of Austrian Association of Pediatric Surgery ... [et Al] = Zeitschrift Fur Kinderchirurgie, 9(4), 267-70.
Gambarara M, et al. Ultra-short-bowel Syndrome Is Not an Absolute Indication to Small-bowel Transplantation in Childhood. Eur J Pediatr Surg. 1999;9(4):267-70. PubMed PMID: 10532274.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ultra-short-bowel syndrome is not an absolute indication to small-bowel transplantation in childhood. AU - Gambarara,M, AU - Ferretti,F, AU - Bagolan,P, AU - Papadatou,B, AU - Rivosecchi,M, AU - Lucchetti,M C, AU - Nahom,A, AU - Castro,M, PY - 1999/10/26/pubmed PY - 1999/10/26/medline PY - 1999/10/26/entrez SP - 267 EP - 70 JF - European journal of pediatric surgery : official journal of Austrian Association of Pediatric Surgery ... [et al] = Zeitschrift fur Kinderchirurgie JO - Eur J Pediatr Surg VL - 9 IS - 4 N2 - Short-bowel syndrome (SBS) either in adults or in children is considered as an indication to small-bowel transplantation (SBTx), particularly in its most severe form with a residual bowel length below 20 cm. Among factors likely to worsen the prognosis, more recent reports also indicate the number of surgical interventions, early onset sepsis and early development of liver disease. We report six cases of ultra-short-bowel syndrome followed from birth to verify the importance of various prognostic factors. In our case series, the male sex is predominating (5:1). Intestinal resection was indicated in 3 patients for multiple intestinal atresias, in 2 for volvulus and in 1 for necrotizing enterocolitis. The length of intestine remaining was invariably less than 20 cm and 2 patients had a preserved ileocecal valve. In most cases, more than 50% of the colon remained. The number of abdominal operations ranged from 1 to 4. In almost all cases (5 of 6), sepsis and hepatopathy developed early. Our experience suggests that rather than depending on the length of intestine remaining or the presence of the ileocecal valve, the prognosis of patients with the extreme-short-bowel syndrome depends on recurrent neonatal onset sepsis and early onset liver impairment. In addition, our case review shows that the extreme-short-bowel syndrome is not necessarily an indication for bowel transplantation. SN - 0939-7248 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10532274/Ultra_short_bowel_syndrome_is_not_an_absolute_indication_to_small_bowel_transplantation_in_childhood_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2008-1072261 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -