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Lack of association between duration of breast-feeding or introduction of cow's milk and development of islet autoimmunity.
Diabetes 1999; 48(11):2145-9D

Abstract

The hypothesis that early exposure to cow's milk or lack of breast-feeding predisposes to type 1 diabetes remains controversial. We aimed to determine prospectively the relationship of, first, duration of exclusive breast-feeding and total duration of breast-feeding, and second, introduction of cow's milk protein as infant formula, cow's milk, or dairy products, to the development of islet antibodies in early life. Some 317 children with a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes were followed prospectively from birth for 29 months (4-73). Mothers kept a home diary and answered infant feeding questionnaires at 6-month intervals. No systematic feeding advice was given. Insulin autoantibodies (normal range <5.5%), anti-GAD antibodies (<5.0 U), and anti-IA2 antibodies (<3.0 U) were measured at 6-month intervals. Cox proportional hazards model of survival analysis detected no significant difference between children who did not develop islet antibodies (225 of 317 [71%]), children with one islet antibody raised once (52 of 317 [16.4%]), children with one antibody raised repeatedly (18 of 317 [5.7%]), or children with two or more antibodies raised (22 of 317 [6.9%]), in terms of duration of exclusive breast-feeding, total duration of breast-feeding, or introduction of cow's milk-based infant formulas, cow's milk, or dairy products (relative risk: 0.91-1.09). Four of the children with two or more islet antibodies developed type 1 diabetes. We conclude that there is no prospective association between duration of breast-feeding or introduction of cow's milk and the development of islet autoimmunity in high-risk children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Endocrinology, Women's and Children's Hospital, North Adelaide SA, Australia. jcouper@medicine.adelaide.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10535447

Citation

Couper, J J., et al. "Lack of Association Between Duration of Breast-feeding or Introduction of Cow's Milk and Development of Islet Autoimmunity." Diabetes, vol. 48, no. 11, 1999, pp. 2145-9.
Couper JJ, Steele C, Beresford S, et al. Lack of association between duration of breast-feeding or introduction of cow's milk and development of islet autoimmunity. Diabetes. 1999;48(11):2145-9.
Couper, J. J., Steele, C., Beresford, S., Powell, T., McCaul, K., Pollard, A., ... Colman, P. G. (1999). Lack of association between duration of breast-feeding or introduction of cow's milk and development of islet autoimmunity. Diabetes, 48(11), pp. 2145-9.
Couper JJ, et al. Lack of Association Between Duration of Breast-feeding or Introduction of Cow's Milk and Development of Islet Autoimmunity. Diabetes. 1999;48(11):2145-9. PubMed PMID: 10535447.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lack of association between duration of breast-feeding or introduction of cow's milk and development of islet autoimmunity. AU - Couper,J J, AU - Steele,C, AU - Beresford,S, AU - Powell,T, AU - McCaul,K, AU - Pollard,A, AU - Gellert,S, AU - Tait,B, AU - Harrison,L C, AU - Colman,P G, PY - 1999/10/27/pubmed PY - 1999/10/27/medline PY - 1999/10/27/entrez SP - 2145 EP - 9 JF - Diabetes JO - Diabetes VL - 48 IS - 11 N2 - The hypothesis that early exposure to cow's milk or lack of breast-feeding predisposes to type 1 diabetes remains controversial. We aimed to determine prospectively the relationship of, first, duration of exclusive breast-feeding and total duration of breast-feeding, and second, introduction of cow's milk protein as infant formula, cow's milk, or dairy products, to the development of islet antibodies in early life. Some 317 children with a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes were followed prospectively from birth for 29 months (4-73). Mothers kept a home diary and answered infant feeding questionnaires at 6-month intervals. No systematic feeding advice was given. Insulin autoantibodies (normal range <5.5%), anti-GAD antibodies (<5.0 U), and anti-IA2 antibodies (<3.0 U) were measured at 6-month intervals. Cox proportional hazards model of survival analysis detected no significant difference between children who did not develop islet antibodies (225 of 317 [71%]), children with one islet antibody raised once (52 of 317 [16.4%]), children with one antibody raised repeatedly (18 of 317 [5.7%]), or children with two or more antibodies raised (22 of 317 [6.9%]), in terms of duration of exclusive breast-feeding, total duration of breast-feeding, or introduction of cow's milk-based infant formulas, cow's milk, or dairy products (relative risk: 0.91-1.09). Four of the children with two or more islet antibodies developed type 1 diabetes. We conclude that there is no prospective association between duration of breast-feeding or introduction of cow's milk and the development of islet autoimmunity in high-risk children. SN - 0012-1797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10535447/Lack_of_association_between_duration_of_breast_feeding_or_introduction_of_cow's_milk_and_development_of_islet_autoimmunity_ L2 - http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=10535447 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -