Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

[Hepatobiliary and pancreatic disorders as risk factors for fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies].
Nihon Rinsho. 1999 Oct; 57(10):2371-5.NR

Abstract

The aim of this article is to describe the fat-soluble vitamin status in patients with hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases, and the contribution of these vitamin deficiency or excess to hepatic injury. A considerable number of patients with advanced liver disease and cholestasis might actually be fat-soluble vitamin deficient, although clinical signs of deficiency are uncommonly seen in patients with vitamin A and E deficiency. Increased bone resorption may be the predominant cause of hepatic osteodystrophy. On the other hand, the possible causes of vitamin K deficiency seen in patients with hepatobiliary disease are the decrease of vitamin K absorption from intestine, the disturbance of vitamin K cycle and the decrease of pool area for vitamin K storage. The intake of vitamin A may be associated with the risk of liver cirrhosis in lifetime teetotalers, although the retinyl palmitate reduces hepatic fibrosis in rats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

jpn

PubMed ID

10540889

Citation

Shirahata, A. "[Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Disorders as Risk Factors for Fat-soluble Vitamin Deficiencies]." Nihon Rinsho. Japanese Journal of Clinical Medicine, vol. 57, no. 10, 1999, pp. 2371-5.
Shirahata A. [Hepatobiliary and pancreatic disorders as risk factors for fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies]. Nihon Rinsho. 1999;57(10):2371-5.
Shirahata, A. (1999). [Hepatobiliary and pancreatic disorders as risk factors for fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies]. Nihon Rinsho. Japanese Journal of Clinical Medicine, 57(10), 2371-5.
Shirahata A. [Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Disorders as Risk Factors for Fat-soluble Vitamin Deficiencies]. Nihon Rinsho. 1999;57(10):2371-5. PubMed PMID: 10540889.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Hepatobiliary and pancreatic disorders as risk factors for fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies]. A1 - Shirahata,A, PY - 1999/12/14/pubmed PY - 1999/12/14/medline PY - 1999/12/14/entrez SP - 2371 EP - 5 JF - Nihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine JO - Nihon Rinsho VL - 57 IS - 10 N2 - The aim of this article is to describe the fat-soluble vitamin status in patients with hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases, and the contribution of these vitamin deficiency or excess to hepatic injury. A considerable number of patients with advanced liver disease and cholestasis might actually be fat-soluble vitamin deficient, although clinical signs of deficiency are uncommonly seen in patients with vitamin A and E deficiency. Increased bone resorption may be the predominant cause of hepatic osteodystrophy. On the other hand, the possible causes of vitamin K deficiency seen in patients with hepatobiliary disease are the decrease of vitamin K absorption from intestine, the disturbance of vitamin K cycle and the decrease of pool area for vitamin K storage. The intake of vitamin A may be associated with the risk of liver cirrhosis in lifetime teetotalers, although the retinyl palmitate reduces hepatic fibrosis in rats. SN - 0047-1852 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10540889/[Hepatobiliary_and_pancreatic_disorders_as_risk_factors_for_fat_soluble_vitamin_deficiencies]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/pancreaticdiseases.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -