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[Interrelationship among nerve conduction velocity, amplitudes of compound muscle and compound nerve action potentials in diabetic neuropathy].
No To Shinkei. 1999 Oct; 51(10):863-6.NT

Abstract

In order to clarify the relationship among amplitudes of compound nerve action potential (CNAP), compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and nerve conduction velocity parameters, data of nerve conduction studies were analyzed in 102 patients with diabetes mellitus. In motor conduction studies CMAP amplitudes after stimulations at the distal nerve trunk, and the polyneuropathy index (PNI), a mean percentage of normal for 12 indices from 4 nerves concerning to the velocity or long distance latency, were evaluated. CNAP was recorded in the median and ulnar nerves from an intrafascicularly inserted microelectrode at the elbow after wrist stimulation. CMAP amplitudes were high in the median and ulnar nerves, and were reduced in the tibial and peroneal nerves. A close relationship was found between PNI and CNAP amplitudes. Among CMAP amplitude parameters tibial nerve, not median or ulnar nerves, had a good correlation with PNI and CNAP amplitude. Along with the progression of diabetic neuropathy, neuropathic signs or symptoms become conspicuous, and nerve conduction velocity drops as is expressed by the PNI level, which reflects the change in nerve conduction velocity in the upper and lower limbs. At the same time CNAP amplitude or CMAP amplitude in the tibial nerve decreases, but in nerves of the upper limb CMAP amplitude doesn't always decrease. So, tibial nerve is best among CMAP amplitude parameters in evaluating the degree of diabetic neuropathy. It is necessary to judge the degree of diabetic neuropathy after due consideration of these facts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Kanagawa Prefectural Cancer Center, Yokohama, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

jpn

PubMed ID

10553586

Citation

Hasegawa, O, et al. "[Interrelationship Among Nerve Conduction Velocity, Amplitudes of Compound Muscle and Compound Nerve Action Potentials in Diabetic Neuropathy]." No to Shinkei = Brain and Nerve, vol. 51, no. 10, 1999, pp. 863-6.
Hasegawa O, Matsumoto S, Iino M, et al. [Interrelationship among nerve conduction velocity, amplitudes of compound muscle and compound nerve action potentials in diabetic neuropathy]. No To Shinkei. 1999;51(10):863-6.
Hasegawa, O., Matsumoto, S., Iino, M., Mori, I., Arita, T., & Baba, Y. (1999). [Interrelationship among nerve conduction velocity, amplitudes of compound muscle and compound nerve action potentials in diabetic neuropathy]. No to Shinkei = Brain and Nerve, 51(10), 863-6.
Hasegawa O, et al. [Interrelationship Among Nerve Conduction Velocity, Amplitudes of Compound Muscle and Compound Nerve Action Potentials in Diabetic Neuropathy]. No To Shinkei. 1999;51(10):863-6. PubMed PMID: 10553586.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Interrelationship among nerve conduction velocity, amplitudes of compound muscle and compound nerve action potentials in diabetic neuropathy]. AU - Hasegawa,O, AU - Matsumoto,S, AU - Iino,M, AU - Mori,I, AU - Arita,T, AU - Baba,Y, PY - 1999/12/20/pubmed PY - 1999/12/20/medline PY - 1999/12/20/entrez SP - 863 EP - 6 JF - No to shinkei = Brain and nerve JO - No To Shinkei VL - 51 IS - 10 N2 - In order to clarify the relationship among amplitudes of compound nerve action potential (CNAP), compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and nerve conduction velocity parameters, data of nerve conduction studies were analyzed in 102 patients with diabetes mellitus. In motor conduction studies CMAP amplitudes after stimulations at the distal nerve trunk, and the polyneuropathy index (PNI), a mean percentage of normal for 12 indices from 4 nerves concerning to the velocity or long distance latency, were evaluated. CNAP was recorded in the median and ulnar nerves from an intrafascicularly inserted microelectrode at the elbow after wrist stimulation. CMAP amplitudes were high in the median and ulnar nerves, and were reduced in the tibial and peroneal nerves. A close relationship was found between PNI and CNAP amplitudes. Among CMAP amplitude parameters tibial nerve, not median or ulnar nerves, had a good correlation with PNI and CNAP amplitude. Along with the progression of diabetic neuropathy, neuropathic signs or symptoms become conspicuous, and nerve conduction velocity drops as is expressed by the PNI level, which reflects the change in nerve conduction velocity in the upper and lower limbs. At the same time CNAP amplitude or CMAP amplitude in the tibial nerve decreases, but in nerves of the upper limb CMAP amplitude doesn't always decrease. So, tibial nerve is best among CMAP amplitude parameters in evaluating the degree of diabetic neuropathy. It is necessary to judge the degree of diabetic neuropathy after due consideration of these facts. SN - 0006-8969 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10553586/[Interrelationship_among_nerve_conduction_velocity_amplitudes_of_compound_muscle_and_compound_nerve_action_potentials_in_diabetic_neuropathy]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/diabeticnerveproblems.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -