Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Race, socioeconomic factors, and area of residence are associated with asthma prevalence.
Pediatr Pulmonol 1999; 28(6):394-401PP

Abstract

Asthma prevalence in the United States has been reported to be higher in minority groups such as Blacks and Hispanics. Because a disproportionate number of individuals from such minority groups are of low socioeconomic status (SES), it is unclear how much of the racial/ethnic differences in asthma prevalence is related to low SES. We investigated the effect of SES on the relationship between race/ethnicity and asthma prevalence in a cohort of families with a history of asthma or allergies from the Boston, Massachusetts area. From 499 families, a cohort of 998 parents and 307 children was identified. We used total yearly family income (<$50,000 vs. > or = $50, 000), highest level of education (< or = high school vs. > or = college), and residence in high-poverty areas vs. low-poverty areas as measures of SES. Yearly family income <$50,000, < or = high school education, and residence in high poverty areas were all associated with increased risks for asthma in both cohorts. In the parental cohort, Blacks and Hispanics (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.5, 2.8; and OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.5, 3.2, respectively) were at greater risk for asthma than Whites. In the cohort of children, Black and Hispanic children (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.0, 8.0; and OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 1.6, 17.5, respectively) were also at increased risk for asthma. When the three measures of SES were included in the multivariable models, the risks associated with Blacks and Hispanics decreased in both cohorts: OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 0.9, 2.0; and OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.0, 2. 6, respectively, for the parents; and OR = 0.8, 95% CI = 0.2, 3.0; and 2.5, 95% CI = 0.5, 11.7, respectively, for the children. We conclude that a large proportion of the racial/ethnic differences in asthma prevalence in our study is explained by factors related to income, area of residence, and level of education.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. augusto.litonjua@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10587412

Citation

Litonjua, A A., et al. "Race, Socioeconomic Factors, and Area of Residence Are Associated With Asthma Prevalence." Pediatric Pulmonology, vol. 28, no. 6, 1999, pp. 394-401.
Litonjua AA, Carey VJ, Weiss ST, et al. Race, socioeconomic factors, and area of residence are associated with asthma prevalence. Pediatr Pulmonol. 1999;28(6):394-401.
Litonjua, A. A., Carey, V. J., Weiss, S. T., & Gold, D. R. (1999). Race, socioeconomic factors, and area of residence are associated with asthma prevalence. Pediatric Pulmonology, 28(6), pp. 394-401.
Litonjua AA, et al. Race, Socioeconomic Factors, and Area of Residence Are Associated With Asthma Prevalence. Pediatr Pulmonol. 1999;28(6):394-401. PubMed PMID: 10587412.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Race, socioeconomic factors, and area of residence are associated with asthma prevalence. AU - Litonjua,A A, AU - Carey,V J, AU - Weiss,S T, AU - Gold,D R, PY - 1999/12/10/pubmed PY - 1999/12/10/medline PY - 1999/12/10/entrez SP - 394 EP - 401 JF - Pediatric pulmonology JO - Pediatr. Pulmonol. VL - 28 IS - 6 N2 - Asthma prevalence in the United States has been reported to be higher in minority groups such as Blacks and Hispanics. Because a disproportionate number of individuals from such minority groups are of low socioeconomic status (SES), it is unclear how much of the racial/ethnic differences in asthma prevalence is related to low SES. We investigated the effect of SES on the relationship between race/ethnicity and asthma prevalence in a cohort of families with a history of asthma or allergies from the Boston, Massachusetts area. From 499 families, a cohort of 998 parents and 307 children was identified. We used total yearly family income (<$50,000 vs. > or = $50, 000), highest level of education (< or = high school vs. > or = college), and residence in high-poverty areas vs. low-poverty areas as measures of SES. Yearly family income <$50,000, < or = high school education, and residence in high poverty areas were all associated with increased risks for asthma in both cohorts. In the parental cohort, Blacks and Hispanics (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.5, 2.8; and OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.5, 3.2, respectively) were at greater risk for asthma than Whites. In the cohort of children, Black and Hispanic children (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.0, 8.0; and OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 1.6, 17.5, respectively) were also at increased risk for asthma. When the three measures of SES were included in the multivariable models, the risks associated with Blacks and Hispanics decreased in both cohorts: OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 0.9, 2.0; and OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.0, 2. 6, respectively, for the parents; and OR = 0.8, 95% CI = 0.2, 3.0; and 2.5, 95% CI = 0.5, 11.7, respectively, for the children. We conclude that a large proportion of the racial/ethnic differences in asthma prevalence in our study is explained by factors related to income, area of residence, and level of education. SN - 8755-6863 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10587412/Race_socioeconomic_factors_and_area_of_residence_are_associated_with_asthma_prevalence_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=8755-6863&amp;date=1999&amp;volume=28&amp;issue=6&amp;spage=394 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -