Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Human error and crew resource management failures in Naval aviation mishaps: a review of U.S. Naval Safety Center data, 1990-96.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999 Dec; 70(12):1147-51.AS

Abstract

The present study examined the role of human error and crew-resource management (CRM) failures in U.S. Naval aviation mishaps. All tactical jet (TACAIR) and rotary wing Class A flight mishaps between fiscal years 1990-1996 were reviewed. Results indicated that over 75% of both TACAIR and rotary wing mishaps were attributable, at least in part, to some form of human error of which 70% were associated with aircrew human factors. Of these aircrew-related mishaps, approximately 56% involved at least one CRM failure. These percentages are very similar to those observed prior to the implementation of aircrew coordination training (ACT) in the fleet, suggesting that the initial benefits of the program have not persisted and that CRM failures continue to plague Naval aviation. Closer examination of these CRM-related mishaps suggest that the type of flight operations (preflight, routine, emergency) do play a role in the etiology of CRM failures. A larger percentage of CRM failures occurred during non-routine or extremis flight situations when TACAIR mishaps were considered. In contrast, a larger percentage of rotary wing CRM mishaps involved failures that occurred during routine flight operations. These findings illustrate the complex etiology of CRM failures within Naval aviation and support the need for ACT programs tailored to the unique problems faced by specific communities in the fleet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

U.S. Naval Safety Center, Norfolk, VA, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10596766

Citation

Wiegmann, D A., and S A. Shappell. "Human Error and Crew Resource Management Failures in Naval Aviation Mishaps: a Review of U.S. Naval Safety Center Data, 1990-96." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 70, no. 12, 1999, pp. 1147-51.
Wiegmann DA, Shappell SA. Human error and crew resource management failures in Naval aviation mishaps: a review of U.S. Naval Safety Center data, 1990-96. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999;70(12):1147-51.
Wiegmann, D. A., & Shappell, S. A. (1999). Human error and crew resource management failures in Naval aviation mishaps: a review of U.S. Naval Safety Center data, 1990-96. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 70(12), 1147-51.
Wiegmann DA, Shappell SA. Human Error and Crew Resource Management Failures in Naval Aviation Mishaps: a Review of U.S. Naval Safety Center Data, 1990-96. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999;70(12):1147-51. PubMed PMID: 10596766.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human error and crew resource management failures in Naval aviation mishaps: a review of U.S. Naval Safety Center data, 1990-96. AU - Wiegmann,D A, AU - Shappell,S A, PY - 1999/12/22/pubmed PY - 1999/12/22/medline PY - 1999/12/22/entrez SP - 1147 EP - 51 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 70 IS - 12 N2 - The present study examined the role of human error and crew-resource management (CRM) failures in U.S. Naval aviation mishaps. All tactical jet (TACAIR) and rotary wing Class A flight mishaps between fiscal years 1990-1996 were reviewed. Results indicated that over 75% of both TACAIR and rotary wing mishaps were attributable, at least in part, to some form of human error of which 70% were associated with aircrew human factors. Of these aircrew-related mishaps, approximately 56% involved at least one CRM failure. These percentages are very similar to those observed prior to the implementation of aircrew coordination training (ACT) in the fleet, suggesting that the initial benefits of the program have not persisted and that CRM failures continue to plague Naval aviation. Closer examination of these CRM-related mishaps suggest that the type of flight operations (preflight, routine, emergency) do play a role in the etiology of CRM failures. A larger percentage of CRM failures occurred during non-routine or extremis flight situations when TACAIR mishaps were considered. In contrast, a larger percentage of rotary wing CRM mishaps involved failures that occurred during routine flight operations. These findings illustrate the complex etiology of CRM failures within Naval aviation and support the need for ACT programs tailored to the unique problems faced by specific communities in the fleet. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10596766/Human_error_and_crew_resource_management_failures_in_Naval_aviation_mishaps:_a_review_of_U_S__Naval_Safety_Center_data_1990_96_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/veteransandmilitaryhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -