Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Ethnic variation in attitudes toward hypertension in adults ages 75 and older.
Prev Med. 1999 Dec; 29(6 Pt 1):443-9.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although critical to the management of hypertension, the attitudes of geriatric patients and possible ethnic group differences in attitudes concerning the disease are poorly understood.

METHODS

Data from a 1995-1996 population-based survey of 507 Hispanic American, African American, and non-Hispanic white adults ages 75 and older were used to assess ethnic differences in perceptions regarding the cause, prevention, and treatment of hypertension, as well as associations between perceptions and use of preventive health services.

RESULTS

African Americans were more likely to attribute hypertension to health behaviors and stress. In contrast, Hispanic Americans were more likely consider the disease a normal part of aging, whereas non-Hispanic whites were more likely to attribute hypertension to heredity or mechanistic causes. Non-Hispanic whites were less likely to perceive hypertension as preventable, whereas Hispanic Americans were less likely to feel that hypertension was treatable. The odds of having a primary care physician, blood pressure checked, or glaucoma checked were lower among older African Americans and Hispanic Americans than older non-Hispanic whites. The odds of having had a recent physical and of emergency room use were higher among African Americans and lower among Hispanic Americans, in relation to non-Hispanic whites.

CONCLUSION

Ethnic differences regarding hypertension were clearly evident in this sample of older adults. In addition, attitudes regarding the cause and treatment of hypertension were found to be associated with both the use and the underuse of preventive health services in all three ethnic groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555-0460, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10600422

Citation

Ontiveros, J A., et al. "Ethnic Variation in Attitudes Toward Hypertension in Adults Ages 75 and Older." Preventive Medicine, vol. 29, no. 6 Pt 1, 1999, pp. 443-9.
Ontiveros JA, Black SA, Jakobi PL, et al. Ethnic variation in attitudes toward hypertension in adults ages 75 and older. Prev Med. 1999;29(6 Pt 1):443-9.
Ontiveros, J. A., Black, S. A., Jakobi, P. L., & Goodwin, J. S. (1999). Ethnic variation in attitudes toward hypertension in adults ages 75 and older. Preventive Medicine, 29(6 Pt 1), 443-9.
Ontiveros JA, et al. Ethnic Variation in Attitudes Toward Hypertension in Adults Ages 75 and Older. Prev Med. 1999;29(6 Pt 1):443-9. PubMed PMID: 10600422.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ethnic variation in attitudes toward hypertension in adults ages 75 and older. AU - Ontiveros,J A, AU - Black,S A, AU - Jakobi,P L, AU - Goodwin,J S, PY - 1999/12/22/pubmed PY - 1999/12/22/medline PY - 1999/12/22/entrez SP - 443 EP - 9 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 29 IS - 6 Pt 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although critical to the management of hypertension, the attitudes of geriatric patients and possible ethnic group differences in attitudes concerning the disease are poorly understood. METHODS: Data from a 1995-1996 population-based survey of 507 Hispanic American, African American, and non-Hispanic white adults ages 75 and older were used to assess ethnic differences in perceptions regarding the cause, prevention, and treatment of hypertension, as well as associations between perceptions and use of preventive health services. RESULTS: African Americans were more likely to attribute hypertension to health behaviors and stress. In contrast, Hispanic Americans were more likely consider the disease a normal part of aging, whereas non-Hispanic whites were more likely to attribute hypertension to heredity or mechanistic causes. Non-Hispanic whites were less likely to perceive hypertension as preventable, whereas Hispanic Americans were less likely to feel that hypertension was treatable. The odds of having a primary care physician, blood pressure checked, or glaucoma checked were lower among older African Americans and Hispanic Americans than older non-Hispanic whites. The odds of having had a recent physical and of emergency room use were higher among African Americans and lower among Hispanic Americans, in relation to non-Hispanic whites. CONCLUSION: Ethnic differences regarding hypertension were clearly evident in this sample of older adults. In addition, attitudes regarding the cause and treatment of hypertension were found to be associated with both the use and the underuse of preventive health services in all three ethnic groups. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10600422/Ethnic_variation_in_attitudes_toward_hypertension_in_adults_ages_75_and_older_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(99)90581-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -