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Longitudinal study of nutrient and food intakes of white preschool children aged 24 to 60 months.
J Am Diet Assoc 1999; 99(12):1514-21JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine nutrient and food intakes of 72 white preschool children primarily from families of middle and upper socioeconomic status and to compare children's nutrient intakes with current recommendations.

DESIGN

Six in-home interviews were conducted with mothers when children were 24 to 60 months old; at each time mothers provided 3 days of dietary information on the child. Children and mothers independently provided information on the child's favorite and least favorite foods at 42 and 54 months.

SUBJECTS

Preschool children (24 to 60 months old) participating in a longitudinal study.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES

Mean nutrient intakes were compared with the most recent Recommended Dietary Allowances/Adequate Intakes. Differences over time were tested with repeated-measures analysis of variance; gender differences were determined with t tests. Food frequencies (i.e., percentage of children consuming specific foods) were determined from dietary recalls and food records. Dietary variety was assessed with the Variety Index for Toddlers or the Variety Index for Children.

RESULTS

Means were consistently less than the RDA/AI for energy, zinc, folate, and vitamins D and E. Energy, carbohydrate, and fat intakes were highest (P < or = .01) at 60 months. Boys consumed more (P < or = .05) protein (10 g), calcium (197 mg), magnesium (35 mg), and pantothenic acid (0.8 mg) at 60 months than did girls. Foods most commonly eaten were fruit drink, carbonated beverages, 2% milk, and french fries. The vegetable group consistently had the lowest variety scores; vegetables also dominated least favorite foods lists.

APPLICATIONS

Parents need to be encouraged to include more sources of zinc, folate, vitamin E, and vitamin D in children's diets. Parents should also encourage their children to eat more vegetables, zinc- and folate-fortified cereals, lean red meats, seafood, vegetable oils, and low-fat milk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville 37996-1900, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10608944

Citation

Skinner, J D., et al. "Longitudinal Study of Nutrient and Food Intakes of White Preschool Children Aged 24 to 60 Months." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 99, no. 12, 1999, pp. 1514-21.
Skinner JD, Carruth BR, Houck KS, et al. Longitudinal study of nutrient and food intakes of white preschool children aged 24 to 60 months. J Am Diet Assoc. 1999;99(12):1514-21.
Skinner, J. D., Carruth, B. R., Houck, K. S., Bounds, W., Morris, M., Cox, D. R., ... Coletta, F. (1999). Longitudinal study of nutrient and food intakes of white preschool children aged 24 to 60 months. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 99(12), pp. 1514-21.
Skinner JD, et al. Longitudinal Study of Nutrient and Food Intakes of White Preschool Children Aged 24 to 60 Months. J Am Diet Assoc. 1999;99(12):1514-21. PubMed PMID: 10608944.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal study of nutrient and food intakes of white preschool children aged 24 to 60 months. AU - Skinner,J D, AU - Carruth,B R, AU - Houck,K S, AU - Bounds,W, AU - Morris,M, AU - Cox,D R, AU - Moran,J,3rd AU - Coletta,F, PY - 1999/12/28/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1999/12/28/entrez SP - 1514 EP - 21 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 99 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine nutrient and food intakes of 72 white preschool children primarily from families of middle and upper socioeconomic status and to compare children's nutrient intakes with current recommendations. DESIGN: Six in-home interviews were conducted with mothers when children were 24 to 60 months old; at each time mothers provided 3 days of dietary information on the child. Children and mothers independently provided information on the child's favorite and least favorite foods at 42 and 54 months. SUBJECTS: Preschool children (24 to 60 months old) participating in a longitudinal study. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Mean nutrient intakes were compared with the most recent Recommended Dietary Allowances/Adequate Intakes. Differences over time were tested with repeated-measures analysis of variance; gender differences were determined with t tests. Food frequencies (i.e., percentage of children consuming specific foods) were determined from dietary recalls and food records. Dietary variety was assessed with the Variety Index for Toddlers or the Variety Index for Children. RESULTS: Means were consistently less than the RDA/AI for energy, zinc, folate, and vitamins D and E. Energy, carbohydrate, and fat intakes were highest (P < or = .01) at 60 months. Boys consumed more (P < or = .05) protein (10 g), calcium (197 mg), magnesium (35 mg), and pantothenic acid (0.8 mg) at 60 months than did girls. Foods most commonly eaten were fruit drink, carbonated beverages, 2% milk, and french fries. The vegetable group consistently had the lowest variety scores; vegetables also dominated least favorite foods lists. APPLICATIONS: Parents need to be encouraged to include more sources of zinc, folate, vitamin E, and vitamin D in children's diets. Parents should also encourage their children to eat more vegetables, zinc- and folate-fortified cereals, lean red meats, seafood, vegetable oils, and low-fat milk. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10608944/Longitudinal_study_of_nutrient_and_food_intakes_of_white_preschool_children_aged_24_to_60_months_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(99)00371-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -