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Egg and milk allergy in asthmatic children: assessment by immulite allergy food panel, skin prick tests and double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr) 1999 Nov-Dec; 27(6):287-93AI

Abstract

There is a perception that asthmatic symptoms may be worsoned by ingestion of certain foods. This study aimed to investigate whether ingestion of cow's milk or egg might induce respiratory symptoms in asthmatic children. Fifty asthmatic children aged 1.5 to 6 years old, with positive Immulite Food Panel FP5 test results were included in the study. Fifty healthy children within the same age group were accepted as control group. Total serum IgE levels were measured and skin prick tests for food allergens including milk and egg were performed. All of the subjects underwent oral, double-blind, placebo-controlled challenge with fresh egg and cow's milk powder. Two medical histories were confirmed by double-blind, placebo-controlled challenge in 9 patients (22.2%). Skin prick tests were positive in 9 patients (18%) with milk and 18 patients (36%) with egg antigen. Two children experienced wheezing, one after ingesting milk and the other after egg challenge (4%). In the control group no positive reactions were seen with egg or milk challenges. Our findings confirm that food allergy can elicit asthma in children, but its incidence is low, even with major allergens such as egg and milk. History, specific IgE determinations and skin prick tests are not reliable in diagnosing food reactions. Since any diet can cause rapid deficiencies in infancy, diet restrictions must not be applied, without performing double-blind, placebo-controlled challenge.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Trakya Faculty of Medicine, Edirne, Turkey. yazicioglu@superonline.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10611552

Citation

Yazicioğlu, M, et al. "Egg and Milk Allergy in Asthmatic Children: Assessment By Immulite Allergy Food Panel, Skin Prick Tests and Double-blind Placebo-controlled Food Challenges." Allergologia Et Immunopathologia, vol. 27, no. 6, 1999, pp. 287-93.
Yazicioğlu M, Başpinar I, Oneş U, et al. Egg and milk allergy in asthmatic children: assessment by immulite allergy food panel, skin prick tests and double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges. Allergol Immunopathol (Madr). 1999;27(6):287-93.
Yazicioğlu, M., Başpinar, I., Oneş, U., Pala, O., & Kiziler, U. (1999). Egg and milk allergy in asthmatic children: assessment by immulite allergy food panel, skin prick tests and double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges. Allergologia Et Immunopathologia, 27(6), pp. 287-93.
Yazicioğlu M, et al. Egg and Milk Allergy in Asthmatic Children: Assessment By Immulite Allergy Food Panel, Skin Prick Tests and Double-blind Placebo-controlled Food Challenges. Allergol Immunopathol (Madr). 1999;27(6):287-93. PubMed PMID: 10611552.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Egg and milk allergy in asthmatic children: assessment by immulite allergy food panel, skin prick tests and double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges. AU - Yazicioğlu,M, AU - Başpinar,I, AU - Oneş,U, AU - Pala,O, AU - Kiziler,U, PY - 1999/12/28/pubmed PY - 2000/2/26/medline PY - 1999/12/28/entrez SP - 287 EP - 93 JF - Allergologia et immunopathologia JO - Allergol Immunopathol (Madr) VL - 27 IS - 6 N2 - There is a perception that asthmatic symptoms may be worsoned by ingestion of certain foods. This study aimed to investigate whether ingestion of cow's milk or egg might induce respiratory symptoms in asthmatic children. Fifty asthmatic children aged 1.5 to 6 years old, with positive Immulite Food Panel FP5 test results were included in the study. Fifty healthy children within the same age group were accepted as control group. Total serum IgE levels were measured and skin prick tests for food allergens including milk and egg were performed. All of the subjects underwent oral, double-blind, placebo-controlled challenge with fresh egg and cow's milk powder. Two medical histories were confirmed by double-blind, placebo-controlled challenge in 9 patients (22.2%). Skin prick tests were positive in 9 patients (18%) with milk and 18 patients (36%) with egg antigen. Two children experienced wheezing, one after ingesting milk and the other after egg challenge (4%). In the control group no positive reactions were seen with egg or milk challenges. Our findings confirm that food allergy can elicit asthma in children, but its incidence is low, even with major allergens such as egg and milk. History, specific IgE determinations and skin prick tests are not reliable in diagnosing food reactions. Since any diet can cause rapid deficiencies in infancy, diet restrictions must not be applied, without performing double-blind, placebo-controlled challenge. SN - 0301-0546 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10611552/Egg_and_milk_allergy_in_asthmatic_children:_assessment_by_immulite_allergy_food_panel_skin_prick_tests_and_double_blind_placebo_controlled_food_challenges_ L2 - http://www.elsevier.es/en/linksolver/ft/ivp/0301-0546/27/287 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -