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Ingestion of red wine significantly increases plasma phenolic acid concentrations but does not acutely affect ex vivo lipoprotein oxidizability.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Jan; 71(1):67-74.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Reduced lipoprotein oxidizability by red wine phenols has been proposed as the basis for a relatively lower incidence of coronary heart disease in red wine drinkers. We showed previously that caffeic and protocatechuic acids isolated from red wine exhibit antioxidant activity in vitro. However, there is no information in the literature on the absorption of these compounds after red wine ingestion.

OBJECTIVES

We sought to determine whether certain phenolic acids can be detected in the circulation after red wine consumption and if their presence has an acute effect on serum and LDL oxidation ex vivo.

DESIGN

Twelve healthy male nonsmokers consumed red wine, phenol-stripped red wine, dealcoholized red wine, or water, each at a separate visit, in random order and 1 wk apart. Beverages were consumed over 30 min and blood was sampled just before beverage consumption and 1, 2, and 4 h after consumption. Plasma caffeic, protocatechuic, and 4-O-methylgallic acids were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We also measured copper-induced serum and LDL oxidizability ex vivo and serum uric acid.

RESULTS

Caffeic acid and 4-O-methylgallic acid concentrations increased significantly (P < 0.025) after consumption of red wine and dealcoholized red wine compared with water or phenol-stripped red wine. Uric acid increased significantly (P < 0.001) after ingestion of red wine, phenol-stripped red wine, and dealcoholized red wine. There was no effect on ex vivo serum or LDL oxidation after any of the beverages.

CONCLUSION

Although red wine and dealcoholized red wine consumption acutely increase plasma phenolic acid and serum uric acid concentrations, the increase is insufficient to influence ex vivo lipoprotein oxidation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, The University of Western Australia, and The West Australian Heart Research Institute, Perth, Western Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10617948

Citation

Caccetta, R A., et al. "Ingestion of Red Wine Significantly Increases Plasma Phenolic Acid Concentrations but Does Not Acutely Affect Ex Vivo Lipoprotein Oxidizability." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 71, no. 1, 2000, pp. 67-74.
Caccetta RA, Croft KD, Beilin LJ, et al. Ingestion of red wine significantly increases plasma phenolic acid concentrations but does not acutely affect ex vivo lipoprotein oxidizability. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(1):67-74.
Caccetta, R. A., Croft, K. D., Beilin, L. J., & Puddey, I. B. (2000). Ingestion of red wine significantly increases plasma phenolic acid concentrations but does not acutely affect ex vivo lipoprotein oxidizability. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 71(1), 67-74.
Caccetta RA, et al. Ingestion of Red Wine Significantly Increases Plasma Phenolic Acid Concentrations but Does Not Acutely Affect Ex Vivo Lipoprotein Oxidizability. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(1):67-74. PubMed PMID: 10617948.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ingestion of red wine significantly increases plasma phenolic acid concentrations but does not acutely affect ex vivo lipoprotein oxidizability. AU - Caccetta,R A, AU - Croft,K D, AU - Beilin,L J, AU - Puddey,I B, PY - 2000/1/5/pubmed PY - 2000/1/5/medline PY - 2000/1/5/entrez SP - 67 EP - 74 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 71 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Reduced lipoprotein oxidizability by red wine phenols has been proposed as the basis for a relatively lower incidence of coronary heart disease in red wine drinkers. We showed previously that caffeic and protocatechuic acids isolated from red wine exhibit antioxidant activity in vitro. However, there is no information in the literature on the absorption of these compounds after red wine ingestion. OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine whether certain phenolic acids can be detected in the circulation after red wine consumption and if their presence has an acute effect on serum and LDL oxidation ex vivo. DESIGN: Twelve healthy male nonsmokers consumed red wine, phenol-stripped red wine, dealcoholized red wine, or water, each at a separate visit, in random order and 1 wk apart. Beverages were consumed over 30 min and blood was sampled just before beverage consumption and 1, 2, and 4 h after consumption. Plasma caffeic, protocatechuic, and 4-O-methylgallic acids were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We also measured copper-induced serum and LDL oxidizability ex vivo and serum uric acid. RESULTS: Caffeic acid and 4-O-methylgallic acid concentrations increased significantly (P < 0.025) after consumption of red wine and dealcoholized red wine compared with water or phenol-stripped red wine. Uric acid increased significantly (P < 0.001) after ingestion of red wine, phenol-stripped red wine, and dealcoholized red wine. There was no effect on ex vivo serum or LDL oxidation after any of the beverages. CONCLUSION: Although red wine and dealcoholized red wine consumption acutely increase plasma phenolic acid and serum uric acid concentrations, the increase is insufficient to influence ex vivo lipoprotein oxidation. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10617948/Ingestion_of_red_wine_significantly_increases_plasma_phenolic_acid_concentrations_but_does_not_acutely_affect_ex_vivo_lipoprotein_oxidizability_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/71.1.67 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -