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Fruit and vegetable intakes and prostate cancer risk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is extensive and consistent evidence that high fruit and vegetable intakes are associated with decreased risks of many cancers, but results for prostate cancer risk have been inconsistent. We studied the associations of fruit and vegetable intakes with prostate cancer risk in a population-based, case-control study of men under 65 years of age.

METHODS

Case participants were 628 men from King County (Seattle area), WA, who were newly diagnosed with prostate cancer. Control participants were 602 men recruited from the same underlying population and frequency matched to case participants by age. Self-administered food-frequency questionnaires were used to assess diet over the 3- to 5-year period before diagnosis or recruitment. Daily nutrient intakes were calculated by use of a nutrient database with recently updated analytic values for carotenoids. Odds ratios for prostate cancer risk associated with foods and nutrients were calculated by use of unconditional logistic regression.

RESULTS

No associations were found between fruit intake and prostate cancer risk. The adjusted odds ratio (ORs) for the comparison of 28 or more servings of vegetables per week with fewer than 14 servings per week was 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.45-0.94), with a two-sided P for trend =.01. For cruciferous vegetable consumption, adjusted for covariates and total vegetable intake, the OR for comparison of three or more servings per week with less than one serving per week was 0.59 (95% CI = 0.39-0.90), with a two-sided P for trend =.02. The OR for daily intake of 2000 microg or more lutein plus zeaxanthin compared with an intake of less than 800 microg was 0.68 (95% CI = 0.45-1.00).

CONCLUSION

These results suggest that high consumption of vegetables, particularly cruciferous vegetables, is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Cancer Prevention Research Program, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109-1024, USA. jcohen@fhcrc.org

    ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Carotenoids
    Case-Control Studies
    Fruit
    Humans
    Logistic Models
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Nutrition Assessment
    Odds Ratio
    Prostatic Neoplasms
    Risk
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    10620635

    Citation

    Cohen, J H., et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Intakes and Prostate Cancer Risk." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 92, no. 1, 2000, pp. 61-8.
    Cohen JH, Kristal AR, Stanford JL. Fruit and vegetable intakes and prostate cancer risk. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2000;92(1):61-8.
    Cohen, J. H., Kristal, A. R., & Stanford, J. L. (2000). Fruit and vegetable intakes and prostate cancer risk. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 92(1), pp. 61-8.
    Cohen JH, Kristal AR, Stanford JL. Fruit and Vegetable Intakes and Prostate Cancer Risk. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2000 Jan 5;92(1):61-8. PubMed PMID: 10620635.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable intakes and prostate cancer risk. AU - Cohen,J H, AU - Kristal,A R, AU - Stanford,J L, PY - 2000/1/6/pubmed PY - 2000/1/6/medline PY - 2000/1/6/entrez SP - 61 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 92 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is extensive and consistent evidence that high fruit and vegetable intakes are associated with decreased risks of many cancers, but results for prostate cancer risk have been inconsistent. We studied the associations of fruit and vegetable intakes with prostate cancer risk in a population-based, case-control study of men under 65 years of age. METHODS: Case participants were 628 men from King County (Seattle area), WA, who were newly diagnosed with prostate cancer. Control participants were 602 men recruited from the same underlying population and frequency matched to case participants by age. Self-administered food-frequency questionnaires were used to assess diet over the 3- to 5-year period before diagnosis or recruitment. Daily nutrient intakes were calculated by use of a nutrient database with recently updated analytic values for carotenoids. Odds ratios for prostate cancer risk associated with foods and nutrients were calculated by use of unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: No associations were found between fruit intake and prostate cancer risk. The adjusted odds ratio (ORs) for the comparison of 28 or more servings of vegetables per week with fewer than 14 servings per week was 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.45-0.94), with a two-sided P for trend =.01. For cruciferous vegetable consumption, adjusted for covariates and total vegetable intake, the OR for comparison of three or more servings per week with less than one serving per week was 0.59 (95% CI = 0.39-0.90), with a two-sided P for trend =.02. The OR for daily intake of 2000 microg or more lutein plus zeaxanthin compared with an intake of less than 800 microg was 0.68 (95% CI = 0.45-1.00). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that high consumption of vegetables, particularly cruciferous vegetables, is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. SN - 0027-8874 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10620635/Fruit_and_vegetable_intakes_and_prostate_cancer_risk_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/92.1.61 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -