Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Measurement of in vivo sunscreen immune protection factors in humans.
Photochem Photobiol. 1999 Dec; 70(6):910-5.PP

Abstract

This study investigates the level of protection provided by sunscreens against solar-simulated UV radiation-induced immunosuppression in humans. The in vivo immune protection factors (IPF) of two broad-spectrum sunscreens were determined by assessing their ability to prevent UV-induced suppression of nickel contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in 15 nickel-allergic volunteers. Each volunteer was irradiated on unprotected skin of the back with different doses of UV daily for 4 days. Multiples of these UV doses were concurrently delivered to sunscreen-treated sites on the contralateral back. Nickel patches were then applied to both irradiated sites and adjacent, unirradiated control sites. Nickel-induced erythema at each site was measured 72 h later with a reflectance spectrometer. Comparison of the nickel reactions of irradiated and unirradiated skin revealed linear UV dose-responses for immunosuppression in both unprotected and sunscreen-treated skin. The minimum level of immunosuppression that can be reliably detected with this method is 20%. Therefore, the UV dose that reduces mean nickel CHS by 20% is the minimal immune suppression dose (MISD). Sunscreen IPF were determined by dividing the mean MISD of sunscreen-treated skin by that of unprotected skin. The sunscreens, with sun protection factors of 9 and 24, had IPF of 6.5 and > 25, respectively.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine (Dermatology), University of Sydney at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10628302

Citation

Damian, D L., et al. "Measurement of in Vivo Sunscreen Immune Protection Factors in Humans." Photochemistry and Photobiology, vol. 70, no. 6, 1999, pp. 910-5.
Damian DL, Barnetson RS, Halliday GM. Measurement of in vivo sunscreen immune protection factors in humans. Photochem Photobiol. 1999;70(6):910-5.
Damian, D. L., Barnetson, R. S., & Halliday, G. M. (1999). Measurement of in vivo sunscreen immune protection factors in humans. Photochemistry and Photobiology, 70(6), 910-5.
Damian DL, Barnetson RS, Halliday GM. Measurement of in Vivo Sunscreen Immune Protection Factors in Humans. Photochem Photobiol. 1999;70(6):910-5. PubMed PMID: 10628302.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Measurement of in vivo sunscreen immune protection factors in humans. AU - Damian,D L, AU - Barnetson,R S, AU - Halliday,G M, PY - 2000/1/11/pubmed PY - 2000/1/11/medline PY - 2000/1/11/entrez SP - 910 EP - 5 JF - Photochemistry and photobiology JO - Photochem Photobiol VL - 70 IS - 6 N2 - This study investigates the level of protection provided by sunscreens against solar-simulated UV radiation-induced immunosuppression in humans. The in vivo immune protection factors (IPF) of two broad-spectrum sunscreens were determined by assessing their ability to prevent UV-induced suppression of nickel contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in 15 nickel-allergic volunteers. Each volunteer was irradiated on unprotected skin of the back with different doses of UV daily for 4 days. Multiples of these UV doses were concurrently delivered to sunscreen-treated sites on the contralateral back. Nickel patches were then applied to both irradiated sites and adjacent, unirradiated control sites. Nickel-induced erythema at each site was measured 72 h later with a reflectance spectrometer. Comparison of the nickel reactions of irradiated and unirradiated skin revealed linear UV dose-responses for immunosuppression in both unprotected and sunscreen-treated skin. The minimum level of immunosuppression that can be reliably detected with this method is 20%. Therefore, the UV dose that reduces mean nickel CHS by 20% is the minimal immune suppression dose (MISD). Sunscreen IPF were determined by dividing the mean MISD of sunscreen-treated skin by that of unprotected skin. The sunscreens, with sun protection factors of 9 and 24, had IPF of 6.5 and > 25, respectively. SN - 0031-8655 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10628302/Measurement_of_in_vivo_sunscreen_immune_protection_factors_in_humans_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -