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Hyperoxaluria in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis--what are the limits?

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The object of this study was to investigate the role for measurement of 24-h renal oxalate excretion in the evaluation of idiopathic calcium stone formers.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Renal excretion rates of oxalate and creatinine were measured in 24-h urines in 46 consecutive male recurrent idiopathic calcium stone formers and 61 healthy males. Furthermore, day-to-day variation in renal oxalate excretion in 10 male recurrent stone formers and 10 healthy males were evaluated by measuring 24-h oxalate excretion on 5 different days in each individual. Concentrations of oxalate in urine were measured using an enzymatic method without ascorbate interference.

RESULTS

The cumulative frequency distribution curves of 24-h renal oxalate excretion rates of stone formers and controls were congruent, and there were no statistically significant differences in oxalate excretion rates between stone formers and controls. Mean 24-h oxalate excretion (95%-confidence intervals) was 0.22 (0.18-0.25) mmol and 0.21 (0.18-0.24) mmol in stone formers and controls, respectively (p = 0.9). The day-to-day variation study did not reveal any differences in renal oxalate excretion pattern between stone formers and controls, and the presence of intermittent hyperoxaluria could not be confirmed. The oxalate excretion rates were generally low.

CONCLUSION

In our region, there appear to be no differences in 24-h renal excretion rates of oxalate between male recurrent idiopathic calcium stone formers and healthy males, and the syndrome of mild hyperoxaluric calcium nephrolithiasis could not be identified in our population of idiopathic stone formers. Hence, a limit of abnormal oxalate excretion that distinguishes an idiopathic stone former from a non-stone former could not be defined in our population. Therefore, the value of routine measurement of urinary oxalate in idiopathic urolithiasis is difficult to accept, and cannot be recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. palle.osther@dadlnet.dk

Source

MeSH

Case-Control Studies
Creatinine
Humans
Hyperoxaluria
Kidney Calculi
Male

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10636575

Citation

Osther, P J.. "Hyperoxaluria in Idiopathic Calcium Nephrolithiasis--what Are the Limits?" Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, vol. 33, no. 6, 1999, pp. 368-71.
Osther PJ. Hyperoxaluria in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis--what are the limits? Scand J Urol Nephrol. 1999;33(6):368-71.
Osther, P. J. (1999). Hyperoxaluria in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis--what are the limits? Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, 33(6), pp. 368-71.
Osther PJ. Hyperoxaluria in Idiopathic Calcium Nephrolithiasis--what Are the Limits. Scand J Urol Nephrol. 1999;33(6):368-71. PubMed PMID: 10636575.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hyperoxaluria in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis--what are the limits? A1 - Osther,P J, PY - 2000/1/15/pubmed PY - 2000/1/15/medline PY - 2000/1/15/entrez SP - 368 EP - 71 JF - Scandinavian journal of urology and nephrology JO - Scand. J. Urol. Nephrol. VL - 33 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The object of this study was to investigate the role for measurement of 24-h renal oxalate excretion in the evaluation of idiopathic calcium stone formers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Renal excretion rates of oxalate and creatinine were measured in 24-h urines in 46 consecutive male recurrent idiopathic calcium stone formers and 61 healthy males. Furthermore, day-to-day variation in renal oxalate excretion in 10 male recurrent stone formers and 10 healthy males were evaluated by measuring 24-h oxalate excretion on 5 different days in each individual. Concentrations of oxalate in urine were measured using an enzymatic method without ascorbate interference. RESULTS: The cumulative frequency distribution curves of 24-h renal oxalate excretion rates of stone formers and controls were congruent, and there were no statistically significant differences in oxalate excretion rates between stone formers and controls. Mean 24-h oxalate excretion (95%-confidence intervals) was 0.22 (0.18-0.25) mmol and 0.21 (0.18-0.24) mmol in stone formers and controls, respectively (p = 0.9). The day-to-day variation study did not reveal any differences in renal oxalate excretion pattern between stone formers and controls, and the presence of intermittent hyperoxaluria could not be confirmed. The oxalate excretion rates were generally low. CONCLUSION: In our region, there appear to be no differences in 24-h renal excretion rates of oxalate between male recurrent idiopathic calcium stone formers and healthy males, and the syndrome of mild hyperoxaluric calcium nephrolithiasis could not be identified in our population of idiopathic stone formers. Hence, a limit of abnormal oxalate excretion that distinguishes an idiopathic stone former from a non-stone former could not be defined in our population. Therefore, the value of routine measurement of urinary oxalate in idiopathic urolithiasis is difficult to accept, and cannot be recommended. SN - 0036-5599 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10636575/Hyperoxaluria_in_idiopathic_calcium_nephrolithiasis__what_are_the_limits L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/3587 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -