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Incremental cost-effectiveness of two zidovudine regimens to prevent perinatal HIV transmission in the United States.
Prev Med. 2000 Jan; 30(1):64-9.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recently concluded clinical trials in Thailand have demonstrated that a short course of zidovudine therapy administered to human immunodeficiency virus-infected women during late pregnancy and labor can substantially reduce the likelihood of perinatal transmission of HIV. This regimen is both less expensive and less effective than the full course of therapy recommended for use in the United States by the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS). The objective of the current study is to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of the full-course zidovudine regimen in comparison to the short-course regimen that was tested in Thailand and to determine conditions under which the PHS-recommended regimen produces a net savings in societal resource utilization, relative to the shorter regimen.

METHODS

We used standard methods of incremental cost-effectiveness analysis and derived cost and effectiveness estimates from published studies. The main outcome measure is the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, which is the additional cost per additional case of perinatal HIV infection averted by the full course of therapy.

RESULTS

Full-course zidovudine therapy costs an additional $21,337 per additional case of HIV infection averted, relative to the shorter regimen; this is much less than the cost of treating a case of pediatric HIV infection.

CONCLUSIONS

Economic and clinical findings both favor full-course zidovudine therapy over short-course therapy to prevent perinatal transmission of HIV in the United States.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for AIDS Intervention Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202, USA. pinkrton@mcw.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10642461

Citation

Pinkerton, S D., et al. "Incremental Cost-effectiveness of Two Zidovudine Regimens to Prevent Perinatal HIV Transmission in the United States." Preventive Medicine, vol. 30, no. 1, 2000, pp. 64-9.
Pinkerton SD, Holtgrave DR, Layde PM. Incremental cost-effectiveness of two zidovudine regimens to prevent perinatal HIV transmission in the United States. Prev Med. 2000;30(1):64-9.
Pinkerton, S. D., Holtgrave, D. R., & Layde, P. M. (2000). Incremental cost-effectiveness of two zidovudine regimens to prevent perinatal HIV transmission in the United States. Preventive Medicine, 30(1), 64-9.
Pinkerton SD, Holtgrave DR, Layde PM. Incremental Cost-effectiveness of Two Zidovudine Regimens to Prevent Perinatal HIV Transmission in the United States. Prev Med. 2000;30(1):64-9. PubMed PMID: 10642461.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Incremental cost-effectiveness of two zidovudine regimens to prevent perinatal HIV transmission in the United States. AU - Pinkerton,S D, AU - Holtgrave,D R, AU - Layde,P M, PY - 2000/1/22/pubmed PY - 2000/3/4/medline PY - 2000/1/22/entrez SP - 64 EP - 9 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 30 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recently concluded clinical trials in Thailand have demonstrated that a short course of zidovudine therapy administered to human immunodeficiency virus-infected women during late pregnancy and labor can substantially reduce the likelihood of perinatal transmission of HIV. This regimen is both less expensive and less effective than the full course of therapy recommended for use in the United States by the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS). The objective of the current study is to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of the full-course zidovudine regimen in comparison to the short-course regimen that was tested in Thailand and to determine conditions under which the PHS-recommended regimen produces a net savings in societal resource utilization, relative to the shorter regimen. METHODS: We used standard methods of incremental cost-effectiveness analysis and derived cost and effectiveness estimates from published studies. The main outcome measure is the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, which is the additional cost per additional case of perinatal HIV infection averted by the full course of therapy. RESULTS: Full-course zidovudine therapy costs an additional $21,337 per additional case of HIV infection averted, relative to the shorter regimen; this is much less than the cost of treating a case of pediatric HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: Economic and clinical findings both favor full-course zidovudine therapy over short-course therapy to prevent perinatal transmission of HIV in the United States. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10642461/Incremental_cost_effectiveness_of_two_zidovudine_regimens_to_prevent_perinatal_HIV_transmission_in_the_United_States_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -