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Food sources of added sweeteners in the diets of Americans.
J Am Diet Assoc 2000; 100(1):43-51, quiz 49-50JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify food sources of added sweeteners in the US diet.

DESIGN

A descriptive study using data from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) 1994-1996 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals. Each subject provided one 24-hour dietary recall. Intake of added sweeteners was calculated using the USDA Food Guide Pyramid servings database.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

A national sample of noninstitutionalized persons aged 2 years and older (N = 15,010).

STATISTICAL ANALYSES

Mean intakes of added sweeteners from all food sources and from specific food categories; percentage contribution of added sweeteners to total energy intake; and percentage contribution of each food category to total intake of added sweeteners. All analyses were conducted for the total sample and for 12 age-gender groups.

RESULTS

During 1994 to 1996, Americans aged 2 years and older consumed the equivalent of 82 g carbohydrate per day from added sweeteners, which accounted for 16% of total energy intake. In absolute terms, adolescent males consumed the most; as a percentage of energy, male and female adolescents had the highest intakes (averaging 20% of total energy from added sweeteners). The largest source of added sweeteners was regular soft drinks, which accounted for one third of intake. Other sources were table sugars, syrups, and sweets; sweetened grains; regular fruitades/drinks; and milk products.

APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS

Intakes of added sweeteners exceed levels compatible with meeting current dietary recommendations. Knowing food sources of added sweeteners for the overall population and for specific age-gender groups can help dietitians provide appropriate nutrition education.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, US Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC 20204, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10646004

Citation

Guthrie, J F., and J F. Morton. "Food Sources of Added Sweeteners in the Diets of Americans." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 100, no. 1, 2000, pp. 43-51, quiz 49-50.
Guthrie JF, Morton JF. Food sources of added sweeteners in the diets of Americans. J Am Diet Assoc. 2000;100(1):43-51, quiz 49-50.
Guthrie, J. F., & Morton, J. F. (2000). Food sources of added sweeteners in the diets of Americans. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 100(1), pp. 43-51, quiz 49-50.
Guthrie JF, Morton JF. Food Sources of Added Sweeteners in the Diets of Americans. J Am Diet Assoc. 2000;100(1):43-51, quiz 49-50. PubMed PMID: 10646004.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food sources of added sweeteners in the diets of Americans. AU - Guthrie,J F, AU - Morton,J F, PY - 2000/1/26/pubmed PY - 2000/1/26/medline PY - 2000/1/26/entrez SP - 43-51, quiz 49-50 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 100 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To identify food sources of added sweeteners in the US diet. DESIGN: A descriptive study using data from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) 1994-1996 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals. Each subject provided one 24-hour dietary recall. Intake of added sweeteners was calculated using the USDA Food Guide Pyramid servings database. SUBJECTS/SETTING: A national sample of noninstitutionalized persons aged 2 years and older (N = 15,010). STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Mean intakes of added sweeteners from all food sources and from specific food categories; percentage contribution of added sweeteners to total energy intake; and percentage contribution of each food category to total intake of added sweeteners. All analyses were conducted for the total sample and for 12 age-gender groups. RESULTS: During 1994 to 1996, Americans aged 2 years and older consumed the equivalent of 82 g carbohydrate per day from added sweeteners, which accounted for 16% of total energy intake. In absolute terms, adolescent males consumed the most; as a percentage of energy, male and female adolescents had the highest intakes (averaging 20% of total energy from added sweeteners). The largest source of added sweeteners was regular soft drinks, which accounted for one third of intake. Other sources were table sugars, syrups, and sweets; sweetened grains; regular fruitades/drinks; and milk products. APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS: Intakes of added sweeteners exceed levels compatible with meeting current dietary recommendations. Knowing food sources of added sweeteners for the overall population and for specific age-gender groups can help dietitians provide appropriate nutrition education. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10646004/Food_sources_of_added_sweeteners_in_the_diets_of_Americans_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(00)00018-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -