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Carotenoids and colon cancer.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Feb; 71(2):575-82.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Carotenoids have numerous biological properties that may underpin a role for them as chemopreventive agents. However, except for beta-carotene, little is known about how dietary carotenoids are associated with common cancers, including colon cancer.

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between dietary alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxanthin and the risk of colon cancer.

DESIGN

Data were collected from 1993 case subjects with first primary incident adenocarcinoma of the colon and from 2410 population-based control subjects. Dietary data were collected from a detailed diet-history questionnaire and nutrient values for dietary carotenoids were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture-Nutrition Coordinating Center carotenoid database (1998 updated version).

RESULTS

Lutein was inversely associated with colon cancer in both men and women [odds ratio (OR) for upper quintile of intake relative to lowest quintile of intake: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.04; P = 0.04 for linear trend]. The greatest inverse association was observed among subjects in whom colon cancer was diagnosed when they were young (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.92; P = 0.02 for linear trend) and among those with tumors located in the proximal segment of the colon (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.51, 0.91; P < 0.01 for linear trend). The associations with other carotenoids were unremarkable.

CONCLUSION

The major dietary sources of lutein in subjects with colon cancer and in control subjects were spinach, broccoli, lettuce, tomatoes, oranges and orange juice, carrots, celery, and greens. These data suggest that incorporating these foods into the diet may help reduce the risk of developing colon cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Utah Medical School, Salt Lake City, USA. mslatter@dfpm.utah.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10648274

Citation

Slattery, M L., et al. "Carotenoids and Colon Cancer." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 71, no. 2, 2000, pp. 575-82.
Slattery ML, Benson J, Curtin K, et al. Carotenoids and colon cancer. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(2):575-82.
Slattery, M. L., Benson, J., Curtin, K., Ma, K. N., Schaeffer, D., & Potter, J. D. (2000). Carotenoids and colon cancer. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 71(2), 575-82.
Slattery ML, et al. Carotenoids and Colon Cancer. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(2):575-82. PubMed PMID: 10648274.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Carotenoids and colon cancer. AU - Slattery,M L, AU - Benson,J, AU - Curtin,K, AU - Ma,K N, AU - Schaeffer,D, AU - Potter,J D, PY - 2000/1/29/pubmed PY - 2000/2/19/medline PY - 2000/1/29/entrez SP - 575 EP - 82 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 71 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Carotenoids have numerous biological properties that may underpin a role for them as chemopreventive agents. However, except for beta-carotene, little is known about how dietary carotenoids are associated with common cancers, including colon cancer. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between dietary alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxanthin and the risk of colon cancer. DESIGN: Data were collected from 1993 case subjects with first primary incident adenocarcinoma of the colon and from 2410 population-based control subjects. Dietary data were collected from a detailed diet-history questionnaire and nutrient values for dietary carotenoids were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture-Nutrition Coordinating Center carotenoid database (1998 updated version). RESULTS: Lutein was inversely associated with colon cancer in both men and women [odds ratio (OR) for upper quintile of intake relative to lowest quintile of intake: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.04; P = 0.04 for linear trend]. The greatest inverse association was observed among subjects in whom colon cancer was diagnosed when they were young (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.92; P = 0.02 for linear trend) and among those with tumors located in the proximal segment of the colon (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.51, 0.91; P < 0.01 for linear trend). The associations with other carotenoids were unremarkable. CONCLUSION: The major dietary sources of lutein in subjects with colon cancer and in control subjects were spinach, broccoli, lettuce, tomatoes, oranges and orange juice, carrots, celery, and greens. These data suggest that incorporating these foods into the diet may help reduce the risk of developing colon cancer. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10648274/Carotenoids_and_colon_cancer_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/71.2.575 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -