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Impact of dietary fat and fiber intake on nutrient intake of adolescents.
Pediatrics. 2000 Feb; 105(2):E21.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the impact of fat and fiber intake on energy and nutrient intake of 15-year-old adolescents.

STUDY DESIGN

Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls were collected on a random sample of 15-year-olds. Subjects were then categorized into groups based on fat and fiber intake, with 319 students meeting criteria for 1 of 4 dietary intake quadrants: low fat, low fiber; low fat, high fiber; high fat, low fiber; and high fat, high fiber. Students with medium fat or fiber intakes were excluded from the study. Low-fat and high-fat intake were defined as <30% and >40% of total energy intake, respectively. Low- and high-fiber intake were defined as <15 g/day and >20 g/day, respectively.

RESULTS

Low-fat and high-fiber intake had a minimal impact on energy intake and did not adversely affect nutrient intake. High-fiber intake was associated with greater likelihood of adequate intake of vitamins A, B6, B12, and C; niacin; thiamin; riboflavin; folacin; magnesium; iron; zinc; phosphorus; and calcium. High-fat intake was associated with greater likelihood of adequate vitamin B12 intake. Significant differences in fat and fiber intake distributions were found for ethnic background and gender, with more non-white than white students in the high-fat groups and more males than females in the high-fiber groups.

CONCLUSIONS

A low-fat and high-fiber diet meeting current nutrition recommendations does not adversely affect energy or nutrient intake, increases nutrient density of the diet, and increases the likelihood of adequate intake for several key nutrients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food and Nutrition, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota, USA. nicklas@badlands.nodak.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10654981

Citation

Nicklas, T A., et al. "Impact of Dietary Fat and Fiber Intake On Nutrient Intake of Adolescents." Pediatrics, vol. 105, no. 2, 2000, pp. E21.
Nicklas TA, Myers L, O'Neil C, et al. Impact of dietary fat and fiber intake on nutrient intake of adolescents. Pediatrics. 2000;105(2):E21.
Nicklas, T. A., Myers, L., O'Neil, C., & Gustafson, N. (2000). Impact of dietary fat and fiber intake on nutrient intake of adolescents. Pediatrics, 105(2), E21.
Nicklas TA, et al. Impact of Dietary Fat and Fiber Intake On Nutrient Intake of Adolescents. Pediatrics. 2000;105(2):E21. PubMed PMID: 10654981.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of dietary fat and fiber intake on nutrient intake of adolescents. AU - Nicklas,T A, AU - Myers,L, AU - O'Neil,C, AU - Gustafson,N, PY - 2000/2/2/pubmed PY - 2000/2/19/medline PY - 2000/2/2/entrez SP - E21 EP - E21 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 105 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of fat and fiber intake on energy and nutrient intake of 15-year-old adolescents. STUDY DESIGN: Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls were collected on a random sample of 15-year-olds. Subjects were then categorized into groups based on fat and fiber intake, with 319 students meeting criteria for 1 of 4 dietary intake quadrants: low fat, low fiber; low fat, high fiber; high fat, low fiber; and high fat, high fiber. Students with medium fat or fiber intakes were excluded from the study. Low-fat and high-fat intake were defined as <30% and >40% of total energy intake, respectively. Low- and high-fiber intake were defined as <15 g/day and >20 g/day, respectively. RESULTS: Low-fat and high-fiber intake had a minimal impact on energy intake and did not adversely affect nutrient intake. High-fiber intake was associated with greater likelihood of adequate intake of vitamins A, B6, B12, and C; niacin; thiamin; riboflavin; folacin; magnesium; iron; zinc; phosphorus; and calcium. High-fat intake was associated with greater likelihood of adequate vitamin B12 intake. Significant differences in fat and fiber intake distributions were found for ethnic background and gender, with more non-white than white students in the high-fat groups and more males than females in the high-fiber groups. CONCLUSIONS: A low-fat and high-fiber diet meeting current nutrition recommendations does not adversely affect energy or nutrient intake, increases nutrient density of the diet, and increases the likelihood of adequate intake for several key nutrients. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10654981/Impact_of_dietary_fat_and_fiber_intake_on_nutrient_intake_of_adolescents_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=10654981 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -