Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Circulating and luminal testicular factors affect LRP-2 and Apo J expression in the epididymis following efferent duct ligation.
J Androl. 2000 Jan-Feb; 21(1):122-44.JA

Abstract

Apolipoprotein J (clusterin or sulfated glycoprotein-2) has been shown to be secreted by the epididymal principal cells, whereupon it binds to sperm in the lumen. Apolipoprotein J also is endocytosed by principal cells along the epididymis. Recently, it has been demonstrated that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 (LRP-2) mediates the endocytosis of Apo J and is present in the epididymis. The purpose of the present study was to determine the factors regulating the synthesis of these 2 proteins in various experimentally treated animals. The epididymides of adult rats were fixed with Bouin's fluid and examined with anti-Apo J and anti-LRP-2 antibodies by a light microscope immunocytochemical method. In normal adult animals, expression of Apo J was evident in principal cells of all epididymal regions except the proximal initial segment. Diffuse cytoplasmic staining indicated Apo J secretion. Reactive apical vesicles, presumably endosomal in nature, suggested endocytosis of Apo J. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 expression was solely apical in nature and was seen as an intense apical band in principal cells of all regions except the proximal and distal initial segment and distal caput regions of the epididymis. Hypophysectomy, up to 28 days after the procedure, did not affect expression of Apo J or LRP-2 in principal cells along the entire epididymis. Orchidectomy, with or without testosterone replacement at all time intervals examined, also did not affect LRP-2 expression along the entire epididymis. This also was noted for Apo J expression in all regions except the proximal initial segment. Thus, expression of these 2 proteins does not appear to be regulated by testicular or pituitary factors. In contrast, bilateral as well as unilateral (intact and ligated sides) efferent duct ligation resulted in dramatic differences in LRP-2 and Apo J expression in principal cells in the various epididymal regions. In the case of LRP-2, a complete absence of reaction was noted in principal cells along the entire epididymis. As for Apo J, expression in the distal initial segment, intermediate zone, and caput region remained unchanged compared with that in normal adult animals, whereas in the corpus and cauda epididymides, results of cytoplasmic staining were negligible. These results suggest that under conditions of efferent duct ligation, a circulating factor emanates from the testis to inhibit expression of LRP-2 and Apo J in these epididymal regions. Furthermore, because Apo J was affected in a region-specific manner, unlike the case for LRP-2, different factors appear to be involved for each protein. These factors may be produced to inhibit proteins from being synthesized by the epididymis in the absence of luminal testicular input and may exist in cases of congenital and pathologic epididymal tubule blockages as well as after vasectomy. In the case of immunostaining for Apo J in the proximal initial segment only, normally unreactive principal cells in control adult animals became intensely reactive after orchidectomy as well as bilateral and unilateral (ligated side only) ligation. As this was not the case for hypophysectomized animals and the intact side of unilateral efferent duct-ligated animals, it is suggested that a testicular factor entering via the lumen of the efferent ducts serves to inhibit Apo J expression in this area. The present data also reveal that after efferent duct ligation, there are circulating factors that inhibit Apo J expression in a region-specific manner (corpus and cauda) and that inhibit LRP-2 expression along the entire epididymis and that these are derived from the testis. Furthermore, the data reveal that a testicular luminal factor appears to inhibit Apo J expression in the proximal initial segment of normal adult animals. Key words: Principal cells, orchidectomy, glycoprotein 330, clusterin, sulfated glycoprotein-2.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Lhermo@med.mcgill.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10670527

Citation

Hermo, L, et al. "Circulating and Luminal Testicular Factors Affect LRP-2 and Apo J Expression in the Epididymis Following Efferent Duct Ligation." Journal of Andrology, vol. 21, no. 1, 2000, pp. 122-44.
Hermo L, Xiaohong S, Morales CR. Circulating and luminal testicular factors affect LRP-2 and Apo J expression in the epididymis following efferent duct ligation. J Androl. 2000;21(1):122-44.
Hermo, L., Xiaohong, S., & Morales, C. R. (2000). Circulating and luminal testicular factors affect LRP-2 and Apo J expression in the epididymis following efferent duct ligation. Journal of Andrology, 21(1), 122-44.
Hermo L, Xiaohong S, Morales CR. Circulating and Luminal Testicular Factors Affect LRP-2 and Apo J Expression in the Epididymis Following Efferent Duct Ligation. J Androl. 2000 Jan-Feb;21(1):122-44. PubMed PMID: 10670527.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Circulating and luminal testicular factors affect LRP-2 and Apo J expression in the epididymis following efferent duct ligation. AU - Hermo,L, AU - Xiaohong,S, AU - Morales,C R, PY - 2000/2/12/pubmed PY - 2000/2/26/medline PY - 2000/2/12/entrez SP - 122 EP - 44 JF - Journal of andrology JO - J Androl VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - Apolipoprotein J (clusterin or sulfated glycoprotein-2) has been shown to be secreted by the epididymal principal cells, whereupon it binds to sperm in the lumen. Apolipoprotein J also is endocytosed by principal cells along the epididymis. Recently, it has been demonstrated that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 (LRP-2) mediates the endocytosis of Apo J and is present in the epididymis. The purpose of the present study was to determine the factors regulating the synthesis of these 2 proteins in various experimentally treated animals. The epididymides of adult rats were fixed with Bouin's fluid and examined with anti-Apo J and anti-LRP-2 antibodies by a light microscope immunocytochemical method. In normal adult animals, expression of Apo J was evident in principal cells of all epididymal regions except the proximal initial segment. Diffuse cytoplasmic staining indicated Apo J secretion. Reactive apical vesicles, presumably endosomal in nature, suggested endocytosis of Apo J. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 expression was solely apical in nature and was seen as an intense apical band in principal cells of all regions except the proximal and distal initial segment and distal caput regions of the epididymis. Hypophysectomy, up to 28 days after the procedure, did not affect expression of Apo J or LRP-2 in principal cells along the entire epididymis. Orchidectomy, with or without testosterone replacement at all time intervals examined, also did not affect LRP-2 expression along the entire epididymis. This also was noted for Apo J expression in all regions except the proximal initial segment. Thus, expression of these 2 proteins does not appear to be regulated by testicular or pituitary factors. In contrast, bilateral as well as unilateral (intact and ligated sides) efferent duct ligation resulted in dramatic differences in LRP-2 and Apo J expression in principal cells in the various epididymal regions. In the case of LRP-2, a complete absence of reaction was noted in principal cells along the entire epididymis. As for Apo J, expression in the distal initial segment, intermediate zone, and caput region remained unchanged compared with that in normal adult animals, whereas in the corpus and cauda epididymides, results of cytoplasmic staining were negligible. These results suggest that under conditions of efferent duct ligation, a circulating factor emanates from the testis to inhibit expression of LRP-2 and Apo J in these epididymal regions. Furthermore, because Apo J was affected in a region-specific manner, unlike the case for LRP-2, different factors appear to be involved for each protein. These factors may be produced to inhibit proteins from being synthesized by the epididymis in the absence of luminal testicular input and may exist in cases of congenital and pathologic epididymal tubule blockages as well as after vasectomy. In the case of immunostaining for Apo J in the proximal initial segment only, normally unreactive principal cells in control adult animals became intensely reactive after orchidectomy as well as bilateral and unilateral (ligated side only) ligation. As this was not the case for hypophysectomized animals and the intact side of unilateral efferent duct-ligated animals, it is suggested that a testicular factor entering via the lumen of the efferent ducts serves to inhibit Apo J expression in this area. The present data also reveal that after efferent duct ligation, there are circulating factors that inhibit Apo J expression in a region-specific manner (corpus and cauda) and that inhibit LRP-2 expression along the entire epididymis and that these are derived from the testis. Furthermore, the data reveal that a testicular luminal factor appears to inhibit Apo J expression in the proximal initial segment of normal adult animals. Key words: Principal cells, orchidectomy, glycoprotein 330, clusterin, sulfated glycoprotein-2. SN - 0196-3635 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10670527/Circulating_and_luminal_testicular_factors_affect_LRP_2_and_Apo_J_expression_in_the_epididymis_following_efferent_duct_ligation_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0196-3635&date=2000&volume=21&issue=1&spage=122 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -