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Saline irrigation in the prevention of otorrhea after tympanostomy tube placement.
Laryngoscope 2000; 110(2 Pt 1):246-9L

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Comparison of intraoperative saline irrigation to otic drops in the prevention of postoperative otorrhea in children with middle ear effusion undergoing bilateral myringotomy with ventilation tubes.

STUDY DESIGN

This study was designed as a blinded, controlled, prospectively randomized trial.

METHODS

Study children were randomly assigned to receive either otic drops for 3 days postoperatively or saline irrigation of the middle ear space at the time of myringotomy. Only children with effusion present at the time of surgery were included. All children were evaluated for drainage 7 to 14 days postoperatively, and the degree of drainage was graded from 0 to 4.

RESULTS

Of the 84 patients entered into the study, 62 patients were eligible for data analysis (16 failed follow-up, 6 records were lost). Of the patients who completed the study, not all had bilateral effusions, resulting in 111 ears for inclusion in the study. Fifty-two ears underwent irrigation, and 10 were noted to have otorrhea (19.2%). Fifty-nine ears received otic drops, resulting in 21 ears with otorrhea (35.6%). Evaluating the degree of otorrhea with a five-point Leichert scale, the average score per ear was 0.42 for the saline irrigation group and 1.07 for the control group. The rate and degree of drainage were both statistically reduced in the saline irrigation group (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS

Using middle ear irrigation at the time of tympanostomy may be more effective than antibiotic drops in preventing postoperative otorrhea.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Naval Hospital, Camp Lejeuene, Jacksonville, North Carolina 28547, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10680924

Citation

Gross, R D., et al. "Saline Irrigation in the Prevention of Otorrhea After Tympanostomy Tube Placement." The Laryngoscope, vol. 110, no. 2 Pt 1, 2000, pp. 246-9.
Gross RD, Burgess LP, Holtel MR, et al. Saline irrigation in the prevention of otorrhea after tympanostomy tube placement. Laryngoscope. 2000;110(2 Pt 1):246-9.
Gross, R. D., Burgess, L. P., Holtel, M. R., Hall, D. J., Ramsey, M., Tsai, P. D., & Birkmire-Peters, D. (2000). Saline irrigation in the prevention of otorrhea after tympanostomy tube placement. The Laryngoscope, 110(2 Pt 1), pp. 246-9.
Gross RD, et al. Saline Irrigation in the Prevention of Otorrhea After Tympanostomy Tube Placement. Laryngoscope. 2000;110(2 Pt 1):246-9. PubMed PMID: 10680924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Saline irrigation in the prevention of otorrhea after tympanostomy tube placement. AU - Gross,R D, AU - Burgess,L P, AU - Holtel,M R, AU - Hall,D J, AU - Ramsey,M, AU - Tsai,P D, AU - Birkmire-Peters,D, PY - 2000/2/19/pubmed PY - 2000/3/4/medline PY - 2000/2/19/entrez SP - 246 EP - 9 JF - The Laryngoscope JO - Laryngoscope VL - 110 IS - 2 Pt 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Comparison of intraoperative saline irrigation to otic drops in the prevention of postoperative otorrhea in children with middle ear effusion undergoing bilateral myringotomy with ventilation tubes. STUDY DESIGN: This study was designed as a blinded, controlled, prospectively randomized trial. METHODS: Study children were randomly assigned to receive either otic drops for 3 days postoperatively or saline irrigation of the middle ear space at the time of myringotomy. Only children with effusion present at the time of surgery were included. All children were evaluated for drainage 7 to 14 days postoperatively, and the degree of drainage was graded from 0 to 4. RESULTS: Of the 84 patients entered into the study, 62 patients were eligible for data analysis (16 failed follow-up, 6 records were lost). Of the patients who completed the study, not all had bilateral effusions, resulting in 111 ears for inclusion in the study. Fifty-two ears underwent irrigation, and 10 were noted to have otorrhea (19.2%). Fifty-nine ears received otic drops, resulting in 21 ears with otorrhea (35.6%). Evaluating the degree of otorrhea with a five-point Leichert scale, the average score per ear was 0.42 for the saline irrigation group and 1.07 for the control group. The rate and degree of drainage were both statistically reduced in the saline irrigation group (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Using middle ear irrigation at the time of tympanostomy may be more effective than antibiotic drops in preventing postoperative otorrhea. SN - 0023-852X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10680924/Saline_irrigation_in_the_prevention_of_otorrhea_after_tympanostomy_tube_placement_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/00005537-200002010-00011 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -