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Disperse blue dyes 106 and 124 are common causes of textile dermatitis and should serve as screening allergens for this condition.
Am J Contact Dermat. 2000 Mar; 11(1):30-41.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Textile dye dermatitis is frequently undiagnosed because clinical awareness is low and because of the absence of good screening allergens in standard patch test series for this type of contact dermatitis.

OBJECTIVES

To determine the incidence of textile dye allergy in patients with problematic eczemas evaluated at a contact dermatitis clinic, and to determine the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis to diperse blue dyes in these patients.

METHODS

We conducted a retrospective study of 788 patients who were patch tested to either the North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) Standard Series or the European Standard Series, in addition to other relevant series. The Chemotechnique textile series was utilized in 271 patients (28%).

RESULTS

Forty patients reacted positively to 1 or more textile dyes, the majority reacting positively to Disperse Blue 106 (33 of 40; 82.5%) and to Disperse Blue 124 (32 of 40; 80%). Ten of 11 tested patients reacted to their own clothing, 9 of whom reacted to the blue/black 100% acetate or 100% polyester liners in their garments.

CONCLUSIONS

Textile dye allergy is more common than previously reported. It can cause marked dermatitis and widespread autoeczematization reactions. The most frequent allergens are Disperse Blue 106 and 124, which are frequently found in the 100% acetate and 100% polyester liners of women's clothing. We recommend that Disperse Blue 106 or 124 serve as the screening allergen for textile dye dermatitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Dermatology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. pkelly@compmore.netNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10684387

Citation

Pratt, M, and V Taraska. "Disperse Blue Dyes 106 and 124 Are Common Causes of Textile Dermatitis and Should Serve as Screening Allergens for This Condition." American Journal of Contact Dermatitis : Official Journal of the American Contact Dermatitis Society, vol. 11, no. 1, 2000, pp. 30-41.
Pratt M, Taraska V. Disperse blue dyes 106 and 124 are common causes of textile dermatitis and should serve as screening allergens for this condition. Am J Contact Dermatitis. 2000;11(1):30-41.
Pratt, M., & Taraska, V. (2000). Disperse blue dyes 106 and 124 are common causes of textile dermatitis and should serve as screening allergens for this condition. American Journal of Contact Dermatitis : Official Journal of the American Contact Dermatitis Society, 11(1), 30-41.
Pratt M, Taraska V. Disperse Blue Dyes 106 and 124 Are Common Causes of Textile Dermatitis and Should Serve as Screening Allergens for This Condition. Am J Contact Dermatitis. 2000;11(1):30-41. PubMed PMID: 10684387.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Disperse blue dyes 106 and 124 are common causes of textile dermatitis and should serve as screening allergens for this condition. AU - Pratt,M, AU - Taraska,V, PY - 2000/2/23/pubmed PY - 2000/4/15/medline PY - 2000/2/23/entrez SP - 30 EP - 41 JF - American journal of contact dermatitis : official journal of the American Contact Dermatitis Society JO - Am. J. Contact Dermatitis VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Textile dye dermatitis is frequently undiagnosed because clinical awareness is low and because of the absence of good screening allergens in standard patch test series for this type of contact dermatitis. OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of textile dye allergy in patients with problematic eczemas evaluated at a contact dermatitis clinic, and to determine the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis to diperse blue dyes in these patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 788 patients who were patch tested to either the North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) Standard Series or the European Standard Series, in addition to other relevant series. The Chemotechnique textile series was utilized in 271 patients (28%). RESULTS: Forty patients reacted positively to 1 or more textile dyes, the majority reacting positively to Disperse Blue 106 (33 of 40; 82.5%) and to Disperse Blue 124 (32 of 40; 80%). Ten of 11 tested patients reacted to their own clothing, 9 of whom reacted to the blue/black 100% acetate or 100% polyester liners in their garments. CONCLUSIONS: Textile dye allergy is more common than previously reported. It can cause marked dermatitis and widespread autoeczematization reactions. The most frequent allergens are Disperse Blue 106 and 124, which are frequently found in the 100% acetate and 100% polyester liners of women's clothing. We recommend that Disperse Blue 106 or 124 serve as the screening allergen for textile dye dermatitis. SN - 1046-199X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10684387/Disperse_blue_dyes_106_and_124_are_common_causes_of_textile_dermatitis_and_should_serve_as_screening_allergens_for_this_condition L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1046199X00000075 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -