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Incorporation of different polyunsaturated fatty acids into eggs.
Poult Sci. 2000 Jan; 79(1):51-9.PS

Abstract

An experiment was carried out to examine thoroughly the relationships among different n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the diet, their deposition into the eggs' fat, and their effect on hens' laying performance. A diet enriched with 4% fish oil (FO) was fed to the birds throughout the 14-wk laying period (Treatment 1; T1); this was the same oil source that was replaced in proportions of 25, 50, 75, or 100% with four different fat sources, resulting in 17 isocaloric dietary treatments: linseed oil (LO; T2 to T5), rapeseed oil (RO; T6 to T9), sunflower oil (SO; T10 to T13), and tallow (T; T14 to T17). Performance parameters were recorded weekly and analyzed on the basis of the replacing fat source. At the end of the 14-wk experimental period, eggs were collected, and their fatty acid (FA) profile was determined. Performance parameters were not significantly different among grouped treatments. Smaller proportions of FO in diets resulted in lower values of saturated and higher values of n-6 FA contents, regardless of the fat source used when replacing FO. The n-6 content increased mostly because of the rise in linoleic acid (LA), although the level of arachidonic acid (AA) was always higher when FO was completely suppressed. The amount of the different n-3 long-chain PUFA was lower (P < 0.001) when FO was present in lesser proportions in the diet. However, the slope of the decline of these FA changed according to the included fat. Replacing FO with LO resulted in the lowest decline of its derivatives by elongation and desaturation and an increase in the total n-3 FA in the form of linolenic acid (LNA).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department de Nutrició Alimentació Animals, Facultat de Veterinària, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain. mariadolores.baucells@uab.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10685889

Citation

Baucells, M D., et al. "Incorporation of Different Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Into Eggs." Poultry Science, vol. 79, no. 1, 2000, pp. 51-9.
Baucells MD, Crespo N, Barroeta AC, et al. Incorporation of different polyunsaturated fatty acids into eggs. Poult Sci. 2000;79(1):51-9.
Baucells, M. D., Crespo, N., Barroeta, A. C., López-Ferrer, S., & Grashorn, M. A. (2000). Incorporation of different polyunsaturated fatty acids into eggs. Poultry Science, 79(1), 51-9.
Baucells MD, et al. Incorporation of Different Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Into Eggs. Poult Sci. 2000;79(1):51-9. PubMed PMID: 10685889.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Incorporation of different polyunsaturated fatty acids into eggs. AU - Baucells,M D, AU - Crespo,N, AU - Barroeta,A C, AU - López-Ferrer,S, AU - Grashorn,M A, PY - 2000/2/24/pubmed PY - 2000/3/11/medline PY - 2000/2/24/entrez SP - 51 EP - 9 JF - Poultry science JO - Poult. Sci. VL - 79 IS - 1 N2 - An experiment was carried out to examine thoroughly the relationships among different n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the diet, their deposition into the eggs' fat, and their effect on hens' laying performance. A diet enriched with 4% fish oil (FO) was fed to the birds throughout the 14-wk laying period (Treatment 1; T1); this was the same oil source that was replaced in proportions of 25, 50, 75, or 100% with four different fat sources, resulting in 17 isocaloric dietary treatments: linseed oil (LO; T2 to T5), rapeseed oil (RO; T6 to T9), sunflower oil (SO; T10 to T13), and tallow (T; T14 to T17). Performance parameters were recorded weekly and analyzed on the basis of the replacing fat source. At the end of the 14-wk experimental period, eggs were collected, and their fatty acid (FA) profile was determined. Performance parameters were not significantly different among grouped treatments. Smaller proportions of FO in diets resulted in lower values of saturated and higher values of n-6 FA contents, regardless of the fat source used when replacing FO. The n-6 content increased mostly because of the rise in linoleic acid (LA), although the level of arachidonic acid (AA) was always higher when FO was completely suppressed. The amount of the different n-3 long-chain PUFA was lower (P < 0.001) when FO was present in lesser proportions in the diet. However, the slope of the decline of these FA changed according to the included fat. Replacing FO with LO resulted in the lowest decline of its derivatives by elongation and desaturation and an increase in the total n-3 FA in the form of linolenic acid (LNA). SN - 0032-5791 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10685889/Incorporation_of_different_polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_into_eggs_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ps/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ps/79.1.51 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -