Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Changes in dietary zinc and copper affect zinc-status indicators of postmenopausal women, notably, extracellular superoxide dismutase and amyloid precursor proteins.
Am J Clin Nutr 2000; 71(3):781-8AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Zinc is an essential trace element for human health and well-being; however, methods currently available for the assessment of zinc status in humans are unsatisfactory.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to critically evaluate the use of various indicators of zinc status in humans in a controlled metabolic ward study.

DESIGN

Indicators of zinc status were measured in 25 healthy postmenopausal women aged 64.9 +/- 6.7 y. After a 10-d equilibration period, volunteers consumed a diet with either a low (1 mg/d; n = 12) or a high (3 mg/d; n = 13) copper content based on a total energy content of 8.4 MJ. They received the same amount of copper throughout the study. Both groups were fed the basal diet (3 mg Zn/d) with no zinc supplement for one 90-d period, and the diet supplemented with 50 mg Zn/d for another 90-d period.

RESULTS

Zinc supplementation significantly increased (P < 0.0001) extracellular but not erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity. This increase was more apparent when subjects were fed the low-copper diet. Zinc supplementation in combination with the low-copper diet significantly decreased (P < 0.01) amyloid precursor protein expression in platelets. Other indicators of zinc status that were significantly elevated after zinc supplementation were as follows: plasma zinc and free thyroxine concentrations and mononuclear 5'-nucleotidase activity.

CONCLUSION

The measurement of serum extracellular superoxide dismutase activity may be useful as a marker for the functional assessment of zinc status in humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

US Department of Agriculture, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9034, USA. cdavis@gfhnrc.ars.usda.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10702173

Citation

Davis, C D., et al. "Changes in Dietary Zinc and Copper Affect Zinc-status Indicators of Postmenopausal Women, Notably, Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Amyloid Precursor Proteins." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 71, no. 3, 2000, pp. 781-8.
Davis CD, Milne DB, Nielsen FH. Changes in dietary zinc and copper affect zinc-status indicators of postmenopausal women, notably, extracellular superoxide dismutase and amyloid precursor proteins. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(3):781-8.
Davis, C. D., Milne, D. B., & Nielsen, F. H. (2000). Changes in dietary zinc and copper affect zinc-status indicators of postmenopausal women, notably, extracellular superoxide dismutase and amyloid precursor proteins. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 71(3), pp. 781-8.
Davis CD, Milne DB, Nielsen FH. Changes in Dietary Zinc and Copper Affect Zinc-status Indicators of Postmenopausal Women, Notably, Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Amyloid Precursor Proteins. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(3):781-8. PubMed PMID: 10702173.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changes in dietary zinc and copper affect zinc-status indicators of postmenopausal women, notably, extracellular superoxide dismutase and amyloid precursor proteins. AU - Davis,C D, AU - Milne,D B, AU - Nielsen,F H, PY - 2000/3/4/pubmed PY - 2000/3/18/medline PY - 2000/3/4/entrez SP - 781 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 71 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Zinc is an essential trace element for human health and well-being; however, methods currently available for the assessment of zinc status in humans are unsatisfactory. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to critically evaluate the use of various indicators of zinc status in humans in a controlled metabolic ward study. DESIGN: Indicators of zinc status were measured in 25 healthy postmenopausal women aged 64.9 +/- 6.7 y. After a 10-d equilibration period, volunteers consumed a diet with either a low (1 mg/d; n = 12) or a high (3 mg/d; n = 13) copper content based on a total energy content of 8.4 MJ. They received the same amount of copper throughout the study. Both groups were fed the basal diet (3 mg Zn/d) with no zinc supplement for one 90-d period, and the diet supplemented with 50 mg Zn/d for another 90-d period. RESULTS: Zinc supplementation significantly increased (P < 0.0001) extracellular but not erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity. This increase was more apparent when subjects were fed the low-copper diet. Zinc supplementation in combination with the low-copper diet significantly decreased (P < 0.01) amyloid precursor protein expression in platelets. Other indicators of zinc status that were significantly elevated after zinc supplementation were as follows: plasma zinc and free thyroxine concentrations and mononuclear 5'-nucleotidase activity. CONCLUSION: The measurement of serum extracellular superoxide dismutase activity may be useful as a marker for the functional assessment of zinc status in humans. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10702173/Changes_in_dietary_zinc_and_copper_affect_zinc_status_indicators_of_postmenopausal_women_notably_extracellular_superoxide_dismutase_and_amyloid_precursor_proteins_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/71.3.781 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -