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Differences in airway responsiveness to acetaldehyde and methacholine in asthma and chronic bronchitis.
Eur Respir J. 2000 Feb; 15(2):260-5.ER

Abstract

Inhaled acetaldehyde may induce bronchoconstriction in asthmatic subjects and provides a new method to investigate airway responsiveness. The objective of the study was to determine whether acetaldehyde was a more specific stimulus than methacholine in differentiating asthma from chronic bronchitis with or without airflow limitation. Bronchial provocation challenges with methacholine and acetaldehyde were performed in 62 asthmatics and in 59 smokers with chronic bronchitis (32 with chronic bronchitis alone and 27 with chronic bronchitis and coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)). The response to both bronchoconstrictor agents was measured by the provocative concentration required to produce a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; PC20). The two types of challenge yielded a similarly high level of sensitivity (100% for methacholine and 92% for acetaldehyde) in revealing airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. However, bronchoprovocation with acetaldehyde yielded considerably greater specificity (95%) than bronchoprovocation with methacholine (24%) in separating asthma from chronic bronchitis. In subjects with asthma, methacholine and acetaldehyde responsiveness were weakly but significantly correlated (r=0.42, p=0.001) but no correlation was found between airway responsiveness to acetaldehyde and baseline FEV1 (r=0.13, p=0.33). These findings suggest that the demonstration of bronchoconstriction in response to acetaldehyde may be a more specific test than methacholine in the differentiation of asthma from chronic bronchitis. Furthermore, methacholine and acetaldehyde hyperresponsiveness are not reflecting the same pathophysiological process in the airways.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Servicio de Neumologá, Hospital Arnau de Vilanova, Valencia, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10706489

Citation

Sánchez-Toril, F, et al. "Differences in Airway Responsiveness to Acetaldehyde and Methacholine in Asthma and Chronic Bronchitis." The European Respiratory Journal, vol. 15, no. 2, 2000, pp. 260-5.
Sánchez-Toril F, Prieto L, Peris R, et al. Differences in airway responsiveness to acetaldehyde and methacholine in asthma and chronic bronchitis. Eur Respir J. 2000;15(2):260-5.
Sánchez-Toril, F., Prieto, L., Peris, R., Pérez, J. A., Millan, M., & Marín, J. (2000). Differences in airway responsiveness to acetaldehyde and methacholine in asthma and chronic bronchitis. The European Respiratory Journal, 15(2), 260-5.
Sánchez-Toril F, et al. Differences in Airway Responsiveness to Acetaldehyde and Methacholine in Asthma and Chronic Bronchitis. Eur Respir J. 2000;15(2):260-5. PubMed PMID: 10706489.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differences in airway responsiveness to acetaldehyde and methacholine in asthma and chronic bronchitis. AU - Sánchez-Toril,F, AU - Prieto,L, AU - Peris,R, AU - Pérez,J A, AU - Millan,M, AU - Marín,J, PY - 2000/3/8/pubmed PY - 2000/4/1/medline PY - 2000/3/8/entrez SP - 260 EP - 5 JF - The European respiratory journal JO - Eur Respir J VL - 15 IS - 2 N2 - Inhaled acetaldehyde may induce bronchoconstriction in asthmatic subjects and provides a new method to investigate airway responsiveness. The objective of the study was to determine whether acetaldehyde was a more specific stimulus than methacholine in differentiating asthma from chronic bronchitis with or without airflow limitation. Bronchial provocation challenges with methacholine and acetaldehyde were performed in 62 asthmatics and in 59 smokers with chronic bronchitis (32 with chronic bronchitis alone and 27 with chronic bronchitis and coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)). The response to both bronchoconstrictor agents was measured by the provocative concentration required to produce a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; PC20). The two types of challenge yielded a similarly high level of sensitivity (100% for methacholine and 92% for acetaldehyde) in revealing airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. However, bronchoprovocation with acetaldehyde yielded considerably greater specificity (95%) than bronchoprovocation with methacholine (24%) in separating asthma from chronic bronchitis. In subjects with asthma, methacholine and acetaldehyde responsiveness were weakly but significantly correlated (r=0.42, p=0.001) but no correlation was found between airway responsiveness to acetaldehyde and baseline FEV1 (r=0.13, p=0.33). These findings suggest that the demonstration of bronchoconstriction in response to acetaldehyde may be a more specific test than methacholine in the differentiation of asthma from chronic bronchitis. Furthermore, methacholine and acetaldehyde hyperresponsiveness are not reflecting the same pathophysiological process in the airways. SN - 0903-1936 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10706489/Differences_in_airway_responsiveness_to_acetaldehyde_and_methacholine_in_asthma_and_chronic_bronchitis_ L2 - http://erj.ersjournals.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=10706489 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -