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Diet and cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study.

Abstract

PURPOSE

To investigate relationships between a wide range of macro- and micronutrients, including antioxidant vitamins, and the three main types of cataract in older people.

DESIGN

Population-based cross-sectional study.

PARTICIPANTS

Two thousand nine hundred people aged 49 to 97 years living in an urban community near Sydney, Australia.

TESTING

Food frequency questionnaires and lens photography.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Lens photographs were graded for presence and severity of cortical, nuclear, and posterior subcapsular cataracts.

RESULTS

Higher intakes of protein, vitamin A, niacin, thiamin, and riboflavin were associated with reduced prevalence of nuclear cataract. After adjusting for multiple known cataract risk factors, the odds ratios for those in the highest intake quintile groups compared to those in the lowest intake quintiles were 0.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-0.8) for protein, 0.5 (95% CI, 0.3-0.9) for vitamin A, 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4-0.9) for niacin, 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4-0.9) for thiamin, and 0.5 (95% CI, 0.3-0.9) for riboflavin. Intake of polyunsaturated fats was associated with reduced prevalence of cortical cataract. No nutrients were associated with posterior subcapsular cataract.

CONCLUSIONS

The nucleus of the lens is particularly sensitive to nutrient deficiencies. Protein, vitamin A, niacin, thiamin, and riboflavin protected against nuclear cataract in this study.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Sydney, Australia. bobc@pub.health.usyd.edu.au

    ,

    Source

    Ophthalmology 107:3 2000 Mar pg 450-6

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Cataract
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Humans
    Lens, Crystalline
    Male
    Middle Aged
    New South Wales
    Nutrition Surveys
    Prevalence
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Urban Population

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    10711880

    Citation

    Cumming, R G., et al. "Diet and Cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study." Ophthalmology, vol. 107, no. 3, 2000, pp. 450-6.
    Cumming RG, Mitchell P, Smith W. Diet and cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmology. 2000;107(3):450-6.
    Cumming, R. G., Mitchell, P., & Smith, W. (2000). Diet and cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmology, 107(3), pp. 450-6.
    Cumming RG, Mitchell P, Smith W. Diet and Cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmology. 2000;107(3):450-6. PubMed PMID: 10711880.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Diet and cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. AU - Cumming,R G, AU - Mitchell,P, AU - Smith,W, PY - 2000/3/11/pubmed PY - 2000/3/18/medline PY - 2000/3/11/entrez SP - 450 EP - 6 JF - Ophthalmology JO - Ophthalmology VL - 107 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate relationships between a wide range of macro- and micronutrients, including antioxidant vitamins, and the three main types of cataract in older people. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: Two thousand nine hundred people aged 49 to 97 years living in an urban community near Sydney, Australia. TESTING: Food frequency questionnaires and lens photography. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Lens photographs were graded for presence and severity of cortical, nuclear, and posterior subcapsular cataracts. RESULTS: Higher intakes of protein, vitamin A, niacin, thiamin, and riboflavin were associated with reduced prevalence of nuclear cataract. After adjusting for multiple known cataract risk factors, the odds ratios for those in the highest intake quintile groups compared to those in the lowest intake quintiles were 0.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-0.8) for protein, 0.5 (95% CI, 0.3-0.9) for vitamin A, 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4-0.9) for niacin, 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4-0.9) for thiamin, and 0.5 (95% CI, 0.3-0.9) for riboflavin. Intake of polyunsaturated fats was associated with reduced prevalence of cortical cataract. No nutrients were associated with posterior subcapsular cataract. CONCLUSIONS: The nucleus of the lens is particularly sensitive to nutrient deficiencies. Protein, vitamin A, niacin, thiamin, and riboflavin protected against nuclear cataract in this study. SN - 0161-6420 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10711880/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0161-6420(99)00024-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -