Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prevention of postmenopausal bone loss by low and conventional doses of calcitriol or conjugated equine estrogen.
Maturitas. 2000 Feb 15; 34(2):179-84.M

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Estrogen deficiency is the most common cause of postmenopausal osteoporosis and estrogen replacement is well known to retard postmenopausal bone loss. Calcium supplement alone is generally considered to be insufficient for the prevention of bone loss associated with estrogen deficiency while the role of calcitriol is unclear. In the present study we examined the efficacy different doses of estrogen or calcitriol in the prevention of postmenopausal bone loss in Thais.

METHODS

The subjects consisted of 146 Thai women no more than 6 years postmenopausal. The subjects were randomly allocated to receive 750 mg supplemental calcium alone, calcium and conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) at 0.3 or 0.625 mg, calcium and calcitriol at 0.25 or 0.5 microg daily. Those receiving CEE also took 5 mg medrogestone for 12 days each month. BMD at L2-4 and femoral neck were measured at baseline 1 year and 2 years after treatments. Data were expressed as mean +/- S.E.

RESULTS

Subjects on supplemental calcium alone had approximately 2.5% decreases in L2-4 (P < 0.05) and femoral BMD (P < 0.01) at 2 years. CEE (0.3 mg) resulted in 3.20 +/- 1.2% increase in vertebral BMD (P < 0.05) while no significant change in BMD was demonstrated at the femoral neck. Likewise, 0.625 mg of CEE induced 5.4 +/- 1.4% increase in vertebral BMD at 2 years (P < 0.001) without change in the femoral BMD. In regard to calcitriol, no significant change in vertebral or femoral BMD was demonstrated with either 0.25 or 0.5 microg calcitriol.

CONCLUSION

We concluded that calcitriol is effective in the prevention of early postmenopausal bone loss in Thais. It represents an option for the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women who are contraindicated for estrogen replacement.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine and Research Center, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Rajthevi, Bangkok, Thailand.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10714913

Citation

Ongphiphadhanakul, B, et al. "Prevention of Postmenopausal Bone Loss By Low and Conventional Doses of Calcitriol or Conjugated Equine Estrogen." Maturitas, vol. 34, no. 2, 2000, pp. 179-84.
Ongphiphadhanakul B, Piaseu N, Tung SS, et al. Prevention of postmenopausal bone loss by low and conventional doses of calcitriol or conjugated equine estrogen. Maturitas. 2000;34(2):179-84.
Ongphiphadhanakul, B., Piaseu, N., Tung, S. S., Chailurkit, L., & Rajatanavin, R. (2000). Prevention of postmenopausal bone loss by low and conventional doses of calcitriol or conjugated equine estrogen. Maturitas, 34(2), 179-84.
Ongphiphadhanakul B, et al. Prevention of Postmenopausal Bone Loss By Low and Conventional Doses of Calcitriol or Conjugated Equine Estrogen. Maturitas. 2000 Feb 15;34(2):179-84. PubMed PMID: 10714913.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevention of postmenopausal bone loss by low and conventional doses of calcitriol or conjugated equine estrogen. AU - Ongphiphadhanakul,B, AU - Piaseu,N, AU - Tung,S S, AU - Chailurkit,L, AU - Rajatanavin,R, PY - 2000/3/14/pubmed PY - 2000/3/14/medline PY - 2000/3/14/entrez SP - 179 EP - 84 JF - Maturitas JO - Maturitas VL - 34 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Estrogen deficiency is the most common cause of postmenopausal osteoporosis and estrogen replacement is well known to retard postmenopausal bone loss. Calcium supplement alone is generally considered to be insufficient for the prevention of bone loss associated with estrogen deficiency while the role of calcitriol is unclear. In the present study we examined the efficacy different doses of estrogen or calcitriol in the prevention of postmenopausal bone loss in Thais. METHODS: The subjects consisted of 146 Thai women no more than 6 years postmenopausal. The subjects were randomly allocated to receive 750 mg supplemental calcium alone, calcium and conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) at 0.3 or 0.625 mg, calcium and calcitriol at 0.25 or 0.5 microg daily. Those receiving CEE also took 5 mg medrogestone for 12 days each month. BMD at L2-4 and femoral neck were measured at baseline 1 year and 2 years after treatments. Data were expressed as mean +/- S.E. RESULTS: Subjects on supplemental calcium alone had approximately 2.5% decreases in L2-4 (P < 0.05) and femoral BMD (P < 0.01) at 2 years. CEE (0.3 mg) resulted in 3.20 +/- 1.2% increase in vertebral BMD (P < 0.05) while no significant change in BMD was demonstrated at the femoral neck. Likewise, 0.625 mg of CEE induced 5.4 +/- 1.4% increase in vertebral BMD at 2 years (P < 0.001) without change in the femoral BMD. In regard to calcitriol, no significant change in vertebral or femoral BMD was demonstrated with either 0.25 or 0.5 microg calcitriol. CONCLUSION: We concluded that calcitriol is effective in the prevention of early postmenopausal bone loss in Thais. It represents an option for the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women who are contraindicated for estrogen replacement. SN - 0378-5122 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10714913/Prevention_of_postmenopausal_bone_loss_by_low_and_conventional_doses_of_calcitriol_or_conjugated_equine_estrogen_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-5122(99)00091-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -