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Hepatitis B, C and human immunodeficiency virus infections in multiply-injected kala-azar patients in Delhi.
Scand J Infect Dis. 2000; 32(1):3-6.SJ

Abstract

Sera from 164 patients with parasitologically confirmed kala-azar and 100 patients with non-kala-azar Delhite in 2 Delhi hospitals were tested for anti-human immunodeficiency (anti-HIV) and anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) antibodies and hepatitis B surface antigens to determine which group is more likely to contract these infections. The mean age of the patients was 32.5 y (+/-6.5 y), (120 M, 44 F). Two patients were from Nepal and the others from the kala-azar endemic state of Bihar, India. As geographical controls, 50 serum samples from sex- and age-matched healthy Bihar residents were also tested for the blood-borne viral infections. All patients had been treated with injectable medicines by 1 or more local physicians before they were referred to the Delhi hospitals. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HCV infection was significantly different between the 2 patient groups. While 2 kala-azar patients (1.21%) were found to be HIV-1 positive, 54 (32.9%) patients had anti-HCV antibodies detected by ELISA and 51 (31.1%) by RIBA test. The seroprevalence of HCV was only 2% in hospitalized non-kala-azar cases and 4% in the geographical controls (p < 0.001). The seroprevalence of HBV was 13.2% in hospitalized kala-azar cases, but only 1.75% in disease control cases and 1.6% in geographical control cases. The difference in infection rates between cases and controls was significant (p < 0.001). The results indicate that kala-azar patients treated locally in Bihar have a greater chance of contracting blood-borne infections. Interestingly, we found that HCV was more prevalent than HBV. These infections were most likely acquired through the re-use of needles by local medical and paramedical practitioners for administering anti-leishmanial drugs. This trend, if not checked immediately, may have drastic consequences in the horizontal transmission of HIV in Bihar.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Laboratory Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. ssingh@medinst.ernet.inNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10716069

Citation

Singh, S, et al. "Hepatitis B, C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections in Multiply-injected Kala-azar Patients in Delhi." Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 32, no. 1, 2000, pp. 3-6.
Singh S, Dwivedi SN, Sood R, et al. Hepatitis B, C and human immunodeficiency virus infections in multiply-injected kala-azar patients in Delhi. Scand J Infect Dis. 2000;32(1):3-6.
Singh, S., Dwivedi, S. N., Sood, R., & Wali, J. P. (2000). Hepatitis B, C and human immunodeficiency virus infections in multiply-injected kala-azar patients in Delhi. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 32(1), 3-6.
Singh S, et al. Hepatitis B, C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections in Multiply-injected Kala-azar Patients in Delhi. Scand J Infect Dis. 2000;32(1):3-6. PubMed PMID: 10716069.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hepatitis B, C and human immunodeficiency virus infections in multiply-injected kala-azar patients in Delhi. AU - Singh,S, AU - Dwivedi,S N, AU - Sood,R, AU - Wali,J P, PY - 2000/3/15/pubmed PY - 2000/4/15/medline PY - 2000/3/15/entrez SP - 3 EP - 6 JF - Scandinavian journal of infectious diseases JO - Scand J Infect Dis VL - 32 IS - 1 N2 - Sera from 164 patients with parasitologically confirmed kala-azar and 100 patients with non-kala-azar Delhite in 2 Delhi hospitals were tested for anti-human immunodeficiency (anti-HIV) and anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) antibodies and hepatitis B surface antigens to determine which group is more likely to contract these infections. The mean age of the patients was 32.5 y (+/-6.5 y), (120 M, 44 F). Two patients were from Nepal and the others from the kala-azar endemic state of Bihar, India. As geographical controls, 50 serum samples from sex- and age-matched healthy Bihar residents were also tested for the blood-borne viral infections. All patients had been treated with injectable medicines by 1 or more local physicians before they were referred to the Delhi hospitals. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HCV infection was significantly different between the 2 patient groups. While 2 kala-azar patients (1.21%) were found to be HIV-1 positive, 54 (32.9%) patients had anti-HCV antibodies detected by ELISA and 51 (31.1%) by RIBA test. The seroprevalence of HCV was only 2% in hospitalized non-kala-azar cases and 4% in the geographical controls (p < 0.001). The seroprevalence of HBV was 13.2% in hospitalized kala-azar cases, but only 1.75% in disease control cases and 1.6% in geographical control cases. The difference in infection rates between cases and controls was significant (p < 0.001). The results indicate that kala-azar patients treated locally in Bihar have a greater chance of contracting blood-borne infections. Interestingly, we found that HCV was more prevalent than HBV. These infections were most likely acquired through the re-use of needles by local medical and paramedical practitioners for administering anti-leishmanial drugs. This trend, if not checked immediately, may have drastic consequences in the horizontal transmission of HIV in Bihar. SN - 0036-5548 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10716069/Hepatitis_B_C_and_human_immunodeficiency_virus_infections_in_multiply_injected_kala_azar_patients_in_Delhi_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00365540050164137 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -