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Natural history of hepatitis C and the impact of anti-viral therapy.
Forum (Genova) 2000 Jan-Mar; 10(1):4-18F

Abstract

The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects some 170 million people worldwide and is responsible for approximately 20% of cases of acute hepatitis and 70% of cases of chronic hepatitis. Acute hepatitis is icteric in only 20% of patients and is rarely severe. Eighty five per cent of the infected patients develop chronic infection which is generally asymptomatic. Among the HCV chronic carriers, 25% have persistently normal serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels despite having detectable HCV-ribonucleic acid in serum, 75% have elevated ALT levels. While the majority of patients with mild chronic hepatitis have a slowly progressive liver disease, the patients with moderate or severe chronic hepatitis may develop cirrhosis within a few years. In patients with HCV-related cirrhosis, the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is 2-5% per year. HCV-related end-stage cirrhosis is currently the first cause of liver transplantation. Treatment with the combination of interferon-alpha and ribavirin induces a sustained virological response in roughly 40% of the patients. The virological response is associated with a biochemical response and histological improvement. It is believed that the decrease of necroinflammatory liver lesions induced by anti-viral therapy in responders, is associated with a decreased risk of development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Hepatology, Claude Bernard Research Centre for Viral Hepatitis and INSERM U-481, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10717254

Citation

Boyer, N, and P Marcellin. "Natural History of Hepatitis C and the Impact of Anti-viral Therapy." Forum (Genoa, Italy), vol. 10, no. 1, 2000, pp. 4-18.
Boyer N, Marcellin P. Natural history of hepatitis C and the impact of anti-viral therapy. Forum (Genova). 2000;10(1):4-18.
Boyer, N., & Marcellin, P. (2000). Natural history of hepatitis C and the impact of anti-viral therapy. Forum (Genoa, Italy), 10(1), pp. 4-18.
Boyer N, Marcellin P. Natural History of Hepatitis C and the Impact of Anti-viral Therapy. Forum (Genova). 2000;10(1):4-18. PubMed PMID: 10717254.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Natural history of hepatitis C and the impact of anti-viral therapy. AU - Boyer,N, AU - Marcellin,P, PY - 2000/3/16/pubmed PY - 2000/3/16/medline PY - 2000/3/16/entrez SP - 4 EP - 18 JF - Forum (Genoa, Italy) JO - Forum (Genova) VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects some 170 million people worldwide and is responsible for approximately 20% of cases of acute hepatitis and 70% of cases of chronic hepatitis. Acute hepatitis is icteric in only 20% of patients and is rarely severe. Eighty five per cent of the infected patients develop chronic infection which is generally asymptomatic. Among the HCV chronic carriers, 25% have persistently normal serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels despite having detectable HCV-ribonucleic acid in serum, 75% have elevated ALT levels. While the majority of patients with mild chronic hepatitis have a slowly progressive liver disease, the patients with moderate or severe chronic hepatitis may develop cirrhosis within a few years. In patients with HCV-related cirrhosis, the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is 2-5% per year. HCV-related end-stage cirrhosis is currently the first cause of liver transplantation. Treatment with the combination of interferon-alpha and ribavirin induces a sustained virological response in roughly 40% of the patients. The virological response is associated with a biochemical response and histological improvement. It is believed that the decrease of necroinflammatory liver lesions induced by anti-viral therapy in responders, is associated with a decreased risk of development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma SN - 1121-8142 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10717254/Natural_history_of_hepatitis_C_and_the_impact_of_anti_viral_therapy_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/3332 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -