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Quality of life in survivors of colorectal carcinoma.
Cancer. 2000 Mar 15; 88(6):1294-303.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Colon carcinoma is a common malignancy that accounts for a substantial share of all cancer-related morbidity and mortality. However, little is known with regard to general and disease specific quality of life in survivors of colorectal carcinoma, particularly from community-based samples of cases across stage and survival times from diagnosis.

METHODS

Subjects with colorectal carcinoma were recruited from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry. Subjects completed two self-administered surveys: the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Scales for Colorectal Cancer (FACT-C) and the Health Utilities Index (HUI) Mark III.

RESULTS

One hundred seventy-three respondents (average age: 70.4 years, 71.4% female) completed the survey. In the first 3 years after diagnosis, quality of life was lower and varied substantially among respondents. After 3 years, respondents in all TNM stages of disease except Stage IV reported a relatively uniform and high quality of life. Pain, functional well-being, and social well-being were affected most substantially across all stages and times from diagnosis. Low income status was associated with worse outcomes for pain, ambulation, and social and emotional well-being. Only emotional well-being scores improved significantly over time in both surveys.

CONCLUSIONS

Those individuals who achieve a long term remission from colorectal carcinoma may experience a relatively high quality of life, although deficits remain for several areas, particularly in those of low socioeconomic status. Sampling design may have excluded the most severely ill patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10717609

Citation

Ramsey, S D., et al. "Quality of Life in Survivors of Colorectal Carcinoma." Cancer, vol. 88, no. 6, 2000, pp. 1294-303.
Ramsey SD, Andersen MR, Etzioni R, et al. Quality of life in survivors of colorectal carcinoma. Cancer. 2000;88(6):1294-303.
Ramsey, S. D., Andersen, M. R., Etzioni, R., Moinpour, C., Peacock, S., Potosky, A., & Urban, N. (2000). Quality of life in survivors of colorectal carcinoma. Cancer, 88(6), 1294-303.
Ramsey SD, et al. Quality of Life in Survivors of Colorectal Carcinoma. Cancer. 2000 Mar 15;88(6):1294-303. PubMed PMID: 10717609.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Quality of life in survivors of colorectal carcinoma. AU - Ramsey,S D, AU - Andersen,M R, AU - Etzioni,R, AU - Moinpour,C, AU - Peacock,S, AU - Potosky,A, AU - Urban,N, PY - 2000/3/16/pubmed PY - 2000/4/29/medline PY - 2000/3/16/entrez SP - 1294 EP - 303 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 88 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Colon carcinoma is a common malignancy that accounts for a substantial share of all cancer-related morbidity and mortality. However, little is known with regard to general and disease specific quality of life in survivors of colorectal carcinoma, particularly from community-based samples of cases across stage and survival times from diagnosis. METHODS: Subjects with colorectal carcinoma were recruited from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry. Subjects completed two self-administered surveys: the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Scales for Colorectal Cancer (FACT-C) and the Health Utilities Index (HUI) Mark III. RESULTS: One hundred seventy-three respondents (average age: 70.4 years, 71.4% female) completed the survey. In the first 3 years after diagnosis, quality of life was lower and varied substantially among respondents. After 3 years, respondents in all TNM stages of disease except Stage IV reported a relatively uniform and high quality of life. Pain, functional well-being, and social well-being were affected most substantially across all stages and times from diagnosis. Low income status was associated with worse outcomes for pain, ambulation, and social and emotional well-being. Only emotional well-being scores improved significantly over time in both surveys. CONCLUSIONS: Those individuals who achieve a long term remission from colorectal carcinoma may experience a relatively high quality of life, although deficits remain for several areas, particularly in those of low socioeconomic status. Sampling design may have excluded the most severely ill patients. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10717609/Quality_of_life_in_survivors_of_colorectal_carcinoma_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -