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Impact of acute illness on nutritional status of infants and young children with sickle cell disease.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate changes in growth, nutritional status, body composition, and energy and nutrient intakes during illness and usual state of health in infants and young children with sickle cell disease.

DESIGN

Sixteen children, aged 0.4 to 5.6 years, with SS type sickle cell disease (SCD-SS) were assessed at the time of hospital admission for an acute illness episode and during an 18-hour overnight follow-up visit 2 to 6 weeks after the acute illness episode when in a state of usual health. Main outcome measures included growth in height and weight compared with reference standards, body composition determined by the skinfold thickness technique and total body electrical conductivity, and dietary intake determined by 24-hour recall during hospital admission and at follow-up.

RESULTS

Height, weight, and weight-for-height z scores did not differ from national reference data; triceps skinfold thickness and arm fat area z scores were less. Mean +/- standard error body fat was 15.6 +/- 2.1% at the time of hospital admission, as measured by total body electrical conductivity, and was not significantly different from the follow-up value (16.2 +/- 2.2%). Mean energy intake was 44 +/- 9% of Recommended Dietary Allowances at the time of admission and differed significantly from the follow-up value of 90 +/- 9% (P < .05).

APPLICATIONS

Infants and children with sickle cell disease appear to be at nutritional risk during an acute illness episode, as indicated by body fat measures and inadequate intakes of energy and macronutrients. Energy intake may be suboptimal for several days surrounding an admission for an acute illness in children with sickle cell disease. Physicians and other health practitioners should be alert to inadequate nutrient intakes of their patients during this time period and may consider supplemental energy to avoid a potential net negative energy balance.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Human Sciences, Morehead State University, USA.

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Acute Disease
    Anemia, Sickle Cell
    Body Composition
    Child, Preschool
    Dietary Proteins
    Eating
    Energy Intake
    Female
    Growth
    Humans
    Infant
    Male
    Nutrition Policy
    Nutritional Status

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    10719407

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of acute illness on nutritional status of infants and young children with sickle cell disease. AU - Malinauskas,B M, AU - Gropper,S S, AU - Kawchak,D A, AU - Zemel,B S, AU - Ohene-Frempong,K, AU - Stallings,V A, PY - 2000/3/17/pubmed PY - 2000/3/25/medline PY - 2000/3/17/entrez SP - 330 EP - 4 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 100 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate changes in growth, nutritional status, body composition, and energy and nutrient intakes during illness and usual state of health in infants and young children with sickle cell disease. DESIGN: Sixteen children, aged 0.4 to 5.6 years, with SS type sickle cell disease (SCD-SS) were assessed at the time of hospital admission for an acute illness episode and during an 18-hour overnight follow-up visit 2 to 6 weeks after the acute illness episode when in a state of usual health. Main outcome measures included growth in height and weight compared with reference standards, body composition determined by the skinfold thickness technique and total body electrical conductivity, and dietary intake determined by 24-hour recall during hospital admission and at follow-up. RESULTS: Height, weight, and weight-for-height z scores did not differ from national reference data; triceps skinfold thickness and arm fat area z scores were less. Mean +/- standard error body fat was 15.6 +/- 2.1% at the time of hospital admission, as measured by total body electrical conductivity, and was not significantly different from the follow-up value (16.2 +/- 2.2%). Mean energy intake was 44 +/- 9% of Recommended Dietary Allowances at the time of admission and differed significantly from the follow-up value of 90 +/- 9% (P < .05). APPLICATIONS: Infants and children with sickle cell disease appear to be at nutritional risk during an acute illness episode, as indicated by body fat measures and inadequate intakes of energy and macronutrients. Energy intake may be suboptimal for several days surrounding an admission for an acute illness in children with sickle cell disease. Physicians and other health practitioners should be alert to inadequate nutrient intakes of their patients during this time period and may consider supplemental energy to avoid a potential net negative energy balance. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10719407/full_citation L2 - http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(00)00103-6 ER -