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Australian food sources and intakes of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.
Ann Nutr Metab. 1999; 43(6):346-55.AN

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS

Both omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are recognised as essential nutrients in the human diet, yet we have little information on the extent to which different food sources contribute to their intake. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the daily intakes and food sources of omega-6 and omega-3 PUFAs in our local community.

METHODS

Three-day food records were obtained from 83 healthy adults living in the Illawarra region of New South Wales. The PUFA composition of the foods which they consumed was derived from food composition tables and recently published food analysis data.

RESULTS

Polyunsaturated margarine, nuts/seeds, bread, snacks/desserts and takeaway foods were important sources of omega-6 PUFAs, while canola oil and margarine, takeaway foods, snacks/desserts and bread were sources of alpha-linolenic acid (LNA), an omega-3 PUFA. As expected, fish was the main source of the very long chain (VLC) omega-3 PUFAs, i.e. eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), to which significant health benefits are attributed. An unexpected finding, however, was that, due to the large amount eaten, meat was also a major contributor (29%) to the dietary intake of VLC omega-3 PUFAs. Median intakes of omega-6 and omega-3 PUFAs were 9.9 and 1.2 g/day, respectively, resulting in a dietary omega-6:omega-3 ratio of 8:1. The median intake of VLC omega-3 PUFA was 0.18 g/day.

CONCLUSION

We have identified food sources and intakes of PUFAs for an Australian subpopulation differentiating between omega-6 and omega-3 PUFAs. Whilst canola and fish were the primary sources of LNA and VLC omega-3 PUFAs respectively, we found that meat made a significant contribution to VLC omega-3 PUFA intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biomedical Science and Smart Foods Centre, University of Wollongong, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10725768

Citation

Ollis, T E., et al. "Australian Food Sources and Intakes of Omega-6 and Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids." Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, vol. 43, no. 6, 1999, pp. 346-55.
Ollis TE, Meyer BJ, Howe PR. Australian food sources and intakes of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Ann Nutr Metab. 1999;43(6):346-55.
Ollis, T. E., Meyer, B. J., & Howe, P. R. (1999). Australian food sources and intakes of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, 43(6), 346-55.
Ollis TE, Meyer BJ, Howe PR. Australian Food Sources and Intakes of Omega-6 and Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids. Ann Nutr Metab. 1999;43(6):346-55. PubMed PMID: 10725768.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Australian food sources and intakes of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. AU - Ollis,T E, AU - Meyer,B J, AU - Howe,P R, PY - 2000/3/22/pubmed PY - 2000/5/20/medline PY - 2000/3/22/entrez SP - 346 EP - 55 JF - Annals of nutrition & metabolism JO - Ann. Nutr. Metab. VL - 43 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND/AIMS: Both omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are recognised as essential nutrients in the human diet, yet we have little information on the extent to which different food sources contribute to their intake. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the daily intakes and food sources of omega-6 and omega-3 PUFAs in our local community. METHODS: Three-day food records were obtained from 83 healthy adults living in the Illawarra region of New South Wales. The PUFA composition of the foods which they consumed was derived from food composition tables and recently published food analysis data. RESULTS: Polyunsaturated margarine, nuts/seeds, bread, snacks/desserts and takeaway foods were important sources of omega-6 PUFAs, while canola oil and margarine, takeaway foods, snacks/desserts and bread were sources of alpha-linolenic acid (LNA), an omega-3 PUFA. As expected, fish was the main source of the very long chain (VLC) omega-3 PUFAs, i.e. eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), to which significant health benefits are attributed. An unexpected finding, however, was that, due to the large amount eaten, meat was also a major contributor (29%) to the dietary intake of VLC omega-3 PUFAs. Median intakes of omega-6 and omega-3 PUFAs were 9.9 and 1.2 g/day, respectively, resulting in a dietary omega-6:omega-3 ratio of 8:1. The median intake of VLC omega-3 PUFA was 0.18 g/day. CONCLUSION: We have identified food sources and intakes of PUFAs for an Australian subpopulation differentiating between omega-6 and omega-3 PUFAs. Whilst canola and fish were the primary sources of LNA and VLC omega-3 PUFAs respectively, we found that meat made a significant contribution to VLC omega-3 PUFA intake. SN - 0250-6807 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10725768/Australian_food_sources_and_intakes_of_omega_6_and_omega_3_polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000012803 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -