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Prenatal lead exposure in Israel: an international comparison.
Isr Med Assoc J. 1999 Dec; 1(4):250-3.IM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prenatal lead exposure (umbilical cord blood lead concentration > 10 (micrograms/dl) may impair cognitive development. Childhood lead poisoning is infrequent in Israel, and there are no data on lead exposure in immigrants to Israel from the former Soviet Union.

OBJECTIVES

To evaluate prenatal blood lead concentrations in Israeli newborns whose mothers were born in Israel and in those whose mothers recently immigrated from Russia, and to compare data of prenatal lead exposure in Israel with those reported from other countries.

METHODS

We compared the UCBLC of 35 newborns of new immigrants from Russia with a group of 35 newborns whose mothers were born in Israel. Venous BLC was also measured in 50 mothers. Data are compared with similar reports on prenatal lead exposure internationally.

RESULTS

The UCBLC in all 70 newborns (mean +/- SD) was 3.53 +/- 1.6 micrograms/dl, and mothers' BLC (mean +/- SD) was 3.90 +/- 1.39 micrograms/dl. UCBLC and BLC in the 50 mother-newborn pairs correlated (r = 0.36, P < 0.01). All newborns except one had UCBLC < 8.0 micrograms/dl. There was no significant difference between UCBLC in the two groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Prenatal lead exposure among the study subjects in both groups was low. In this sample the newborns of mothers born in Israel and those whose mothers recently immigrated from Russia were not found to be at risk for lead poisoning. Prenatal lead exposure in this sample was low compared to that reported from various parts of the world.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Hadassah University Hospital, Mt. Scopus, Israel. dvdamitai@matat.health.gov.ilNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10731354

Citation

Amitai, Y, et al. "Prenatal Lead Exposure in Israel: an International Comparison." The Israel Medical Association Journal : IMAJ, vol. 1, no. 4, 1999, pp. 250-3.
Amitai Y, Katz D, Lifshitz M, et al. Prenatal lead exposure in Israel: an international comparison. Isr Med Assoc J. 1999;1(4):250-3.
Amitai, Y., Katz, D., Lifshitz, M., Gofin, R., Tepferberg, M., & Almog, S. (1999). Prenatal lead exposure in Israel: an international comparison. The Israel Medical Association Journal : IMAJ, 1(4), 250-3.
Amitai Y, et al. Prenatal Lead Exposure in Israel: an International Comparison. Isr Med Assoc J. 1999;1(4):250-3. PubMed PMID: 10731354.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal lead exposure in Israel: an international comparison. AU - Amitai,Y, AU - Katz,D, AU - Lifshitz,M, AU - Gofin,R, AU - Tepferberg,M, AU - Almog,S, PY - 2000/3/25/pubmed PY - 2000/4/25/medline PY - 2000/3/25/entrez SP - 250 EP - 3 JF - The Israel Medical Association journal : IMAJ JO - Isr Med Assoc J VL - 1 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Prenatal lead exposure (umbilical cord blood lead concentration > 10 (micrograms/dl) may impair cognitive development. Childhood lead poisoning is infrequent in Israel, and there are no data on lead exposure in immigrants to Israel from the former Soviet Union. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate prenatal blood lead concentrations in Israeli newborns whose mothers were born in Israel and in those whose mothers recently immigrated from Russia, and to compare data of prenatal lead exposure in Israel with those reported from other countries. METHODS: We compared the UCBLC of 35 newborns of new immigrants from Russia with a group of 35 newborns whose mothers were born in Israel. Venous BLC was also measured in 50 mothers. Data are compared with similar reports on prenatal lead exposure internationally. RESULTS: The UCBLC in all 70 newborns (mean +/- SD) was 3.53 +/- 1.6 micrograms/dl, and mothers' BLC (mean +/- SD) was 3.90 +/- 1.39 micrograms/dl. UCBLC and BLC in the 50 mother-newborn pairs correlated (r = 0.36, P < 0.01). All newborns except one had UCBLC < 8.0 micrograms/dl. There was no significant difference between UCBLC in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal lead exposure among the study subjects in both groups was low. In this sample the newborns of mothers born in Israel and those whose mothers recently immigrated from Russia were not found to be at risk for lead poisoning. Prenatal lead exposure in this sample was low compared to that reported from various parts of the world. SN - 1565-1088 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10731354/Prenatal_lead_exposure_in_Israel:_an_international_comparison_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/leadpoisoning.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -