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A randomized controlled trial of smoking cessation counseling after myocardial infarction.
Prev Med. 2000 Apr; 30(4):261-8.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Smoking cessation after myocardial infarction (MI) has been associated with a 50% reduction in mortality but in-hospital smoking cessation interventions are rarely part of routine clinical practice.

METHODS

One hundred cigarette smokers consecutively admitted during 1996 with MI were assigned to minimal care or to a hospital-based smoking cessation program. Intervention consisted of bedside cessation counseling followed by seven telephone calls over the 6 months following discharge. Primary outcomes were abstinence rates measured at 6 months and 1 year post-discharge.

RESULTS

At follow-up, 43 and 34% of participants in minimal care and 67 and 55% of participants in intervention were abstinent at 6 and 12 months. respectively (P<0.05). Abstinence rates were calculated assuming that participants lost to attrition were smokers at follow-up. Intervention and self-efficacy were independent predictors of smoking status at follow-up. Low self-efficacy combined with no intervention resulted in a 93% relapse rate by 1 year (P<0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

A hospital-based smoking cessation program consisting of inpatient counseling and telephone follow-up substantially increases smoking abstinence 1 year after discharge in patients post-MI. Patients with low self-efficacy are almost certain to relapse without intervention. Such smoking cessation programs should be part of the management of patients with MI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, 06102, USA. edornel@harthosp.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10731452

Citation

Dornelas, E A., et al. "A Randomized Controlled Trial of Smoking Cessation Counseling After Myocardial Infarction." Preventive Medicine, vol. 30, no. 4, 2000, pp. 261-8.
Dornelas EA, Sampson RA, Gray JF, et al. A randomized controlled trial of smoking cessation counseling after myocardial infarction. Prev Med. 2000;30(4):261-8.
Dornelas, E. A., Sampson, R. A., Gray, J. F., Waters, D., & Thompson, P. D. (2000). A randomized controlled trial of smoking cessation counseling after myocardial infarction. Preventive Medicine, 30(4), 261-8.
Dornelas EA, et al. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Smoking Cessation Counseling After Myocardial Infarction. Prev Med. 2000;30(4):261-8. PubMed PMID: 10731452.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A randomized controlled trial of smoking cessation counseling after myocardial infarction. AU - Dornelas,E A, AU - Sampson,R A, AU - Gray,J F, AU - Waters,D, AU - Thompson,P D, PY - 2000/3/25/pubmed PY - 2000/5/20/medline PY - 2000/3/25/entrez SP - 261 EP - 8 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 30 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation after myocardial infarction (MI) has been associated with a 50% reduction in mortality but in-hospital smoking cessation interventions are rarely part of routine clinical practice. METHODS: One hundred cigarette smokers consecutively admitted during 1996 with MI were assigned to minimal care or to a hospital-based smoking cessation program. Intervention consisted of bedside cessation counseling followed by seven telephone calls over the 6 months following discharge. Primary outcomes were abstinence rates measured at 6 months and 1 year post-discharge. RESULTS: At follow-up, 43 and 34% of participants in minimal care and 67 and 55% of participants in intervention were abstinent at 6 and 12 months. respectively (P<0.05). Abstinence rates were calculated assuming that participants lost to attrition were smokers at follow-up. Intervention and self-efficacy were independent predictors of smoking status at follow-up. Low self-efficacy combined with no intervention resulted in a 93% relapse rate by 1 year (P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: A hospital-based smoking cessation program consisting of inpatient counseling and telephone follow-up substantially increases smoking abstinence 1 year after discharge in patients post-MI. Patients with low self-efficacy are almost certain to relapse without intervention. Such smoking cessation programs should be part of the management of patients with MI. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10731452/A_randomized_controlled_trial_of_smoking_cessation_counseling_after_myocardial_infarction_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(00)90644-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -