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Effects of familial predisposition to obesity on energy expenditure in multiethnic prepubertal girls.
Am J Clin Nutr 2000; 71(4):893-900AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing and the causes of this are unknown.

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to determine whether energy expenditure (EE), measured by 24-h calorimetry and doubly labeled water, differed in normal-weight-for-height, multiethnic prepubertal girls with or without a familial predisposition to obesity.

DESIGN

Normal-weight, prepubertal white (n = 52), African American (n = 30), and Hispanic (n = 19) girls with a mean (+/-SD) age of 8.5 +/- 0.4 y were studied according to parental leanness and overweight or obesity. The girls were grouped according to whether they had 2 lean parents (n = 30), 2 obese parents (n = 27), or 1 lean and 1 obese parent (n = 44). Basal metabolic rate (BMR), sleeping metabolic rate (SMR), 24-h EE, respiratory quotient, heart rate, and activity were measured by 24-h room calorimetry; free-living total EE (TEE), activity-related EE (AEE), and physical activity level were measured by doubly labeled water. EE was standardized by fat-free mass (FFM).

RESULTS

There were no significant differences among familial groups in weight, height, fat mass, FFM, or percentage body fat. African American girls had a higher FFM than did white or Hispanic girls (P < 0.05). BMR, SMR, 24-h EE, respiratory quotient, heart rate, and activity levels were not significantly different among familial groups. Additionally, there were no significant familial group differences in TEE, AEE, or physical activity level. However, BMR, SMR, and TEE were lower in African American girls than in white girls (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

There was no significant difference in EE between normal-weight, multiethnic prepubertal girls predisposed to obesity and those not predisposed to obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

US Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. mtreuth@jhsph.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10731494

Citation

Treuth, M S., et al. "Effects of Familial Predisposition to Obesity On Energy Expenditure in Multiethnic Prepubertal Girls." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 71, no. 4, 2000, pp. 893-900.
Treuth MS, Butte NF, Wong WW. Effects of familial predisposition to obesity on energy expenditure in multiethnic prepubertal girls. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(4):893-900.
Treuth, M. S., Butte, N. F., & Wong, W. W. (2000). Effects of familial predisposition to obesity on energy expenditure in multiethnic prepubertal girls. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 71(4), pp. 893-900.
Treuth MS, Butte NF, Wong WW. Effects of Familial Predisposition to Obesity On Energy Expenditure in Multiethnic Prepubertal Girls. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(4):893-900. PubMed PMID: 10731494.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of familial predisposition to obesity on energy expenditure in multiethnic prepubertal girls. AU - Treuth,M S, AU - Butte,N F, AU - Wong,W W, PY - 2000/3/25/pubmed PY - 2000/4/25/medline PY - 2000/3/25/entrez SP - 893 EP - 900 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 71 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing and the causes of this are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine whether energy expenditure (EE), measured by 24-h calorimetry and doubly labeled water, differed in normal-weight-for-height, multiethnic prepubertal girls with or without a familial predisposition to obesity. DESIGN: Normal-weight, prepubertal white (n = 52), African American (n = 30), and Hispanic (n = 19) girls with a mean (+/-SD) age of 8.5 +/- 0.4 y were studied according to parental leanness and overweight or obesity. The girls were grouped according to whether they had 2 lean parents (n = 30), 2 obese parents (n = 27), or 1 lean and 1 obese parent (n = 44). Basal metabolic rate (BMR), sleeping metabolic rate (SMR), 24-h EE, respiratory quotient, heart rate, and activity were measured by 24-h room calorimetry; free-living total EE (TEE), activity-related EE (AEE), and physical activity level were measured by doubly labeled water. EE was standardized by fat-free mass (FFM). RESULTS: There were no significant differences among familial groups in weight, height, fat mass, FFM, or percentage body fat. African American girls had a higher FFM than did white or Hispanic girls (P < 0.05). BMR, SMR, 24-h EE, respiratory quotient, heart rate, and activity levels were not significantly different among familial groups. Additionally, there were no significant familial group differences in TEE, AEE, or physical activity level. However, BMR, SMR, and TEE were lower in African American girls than in white girls (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference in EE between normal-weight, multiethnic prepubertal girls predisposed to obesity and those not predisposed to obesity. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10731494/Effects_of_familial_predisposition_to_obesity_on_energy_expenditure_in_multiethnic_prepubertal_girls_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/71.4.893 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -