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Estimation of nonheme-iron bioavailability from meal composition.
Am J Clin Nutr 2000; 71(4):937-43AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Considerable data are available on the individual effects of dietary factors on nonheme-iron absorption, but their combined effect when they are present in the same meal is not known.

OBJECTIVE

Our objective was to predict the bioavailability of iron from complex meals that are consumed commonly in the United States on the basis of the contents of factors that are known to promote or inhibit food iron absorption.

DESIGN

Radioisotopic measurements of nonheme-iron absorption from 25 meals were made in 86 volunteer subjects by using extrinsic radioiron labeling. The meal contents of nonheme iron, calcium, ascorbic acid, polyphenols, and phytic acid were determined by biochemical analysis; energy and protein contents were estimated from food-composition tables. Animal tissue content was based on weight or was obtained from the manufacturer.

RESULTS

After adjusting iron absorption for differences in iron status, the significant biochemical predictors of iron absorption as determined by multiple regression analysis were the contents of animal tissue (P = 0.0001), phytic acid (P = 0.0001), and ascorbic acid (P = 0. 0441). Collectively, these 3 variables accounted for 16.4% of the variation in absorption. On the basis of the multiple regression analysis, we developed the following equation to estimate iron absorption: Ln absorption, % (adjusted to serum ferritin concentration of 30 microg/L) = 1.9786 + (0.0123 x animal tissue in g) - (0.0034 x phytic acid in mg) + (0.0065 x ascorbic acid in mg).

CONCLUSION

For the 25 meals evaluated, only the contents of animal tissue, phytic acid, and ascorbic acid were useful for estimating nonheme-iron absorption.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, USA. mbreddy@iastate.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10731500

Citation

Reddy, M B., et al. "Estimation of Nonheme-iron Bioavailability From Meal Composition." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 71, no. 4, 2000, pp. 937-43.
Reddy MB, Hurrell RF, Cook JD. Estimation of nonheme-iron bioavailability from meal composition. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(4):937-43.
Reddy, M. B., Hurrell, R. F., & Cook, J. D. (2000). Estimation of nonheme-iron bioavailability from meal composition. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 71(4), pp. 937-43.
Reddy MB, Hurrell RF, Cook JD. Estimation of Nonheme-iron Bioavailability From Meal Composition. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(4):937-43. PubMed PMID: 10731500.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Estimation of nonheme-iron bioavailability from meal composition. AU - Reddy,M B, AU - Hurrell,R F, AU - Cook,J D, PY - 2000/3/25/pubmed PY - 2000/4/25/medline PY - 2000/3/25/entrez SP - 937 EP - 43 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 71 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Considerable data are available on the individual effects of dietary factors on nonheme-iron absorption, but their combined effect when they are present in the same meal is not known. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to predict the bioavailability of iron from complex meals that are consumed commonly in the United States on the basis of the contents of factors that are known to promote or inhibit food iron absorption. DESIGN: Radioisotopic measurements of nonheme-iron absorption from 25 meals were made in 86 volunteer subjects by using extrinsic radioiron labeling. The meal contents of nonheme iron, calcium, ascorbic acid, polyphenols, and phytic acid were determined by biochemical analysis; energy and protein contents were estimated from food-composition tables. Animal tissue content was based on weight or was obtained from the manufacturer. RESULTS: After adjusting iron absorption for differences in iron status, the significant biochemical predictors of iron absorption as determined by multiple regression analysis were the contents of animal tissue (P = 0.0001), phytic acid (P = 0.0001), and ascorbic acid (P = 0. 0441). Collectively, these 3 variables accounted for 16.4% of the variation in absorption. On the basis of the multiple regression analysis, we developed the following equation to estimate iron absorption: Ln absorption, % (adjusted to serum ferritin concentration of 30 microg/L) = 1.9786 + (0.0123 x animal tissue in g) - (0.0034 x phytic acid in mg) + (0.0065 x ascorbic acid in mg). CONCLUSION: For the 25 meals evaluated, only the contents of animal tissue, phytic acid, and ascorbic acid were useful for estimating nonheme-iron absorption. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10731500/Estimation_of_nonheme_iron_bioavailability_from_meal_composition_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/71.4.937 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -